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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2003): Community Regeneration and Development - UK

CHILDREN AND REGENERATION: SETTING AN AGENDA FOR COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION AND INTEGRATION

H. Matthews

Children and Society, vol.17, 2003, p.264-276

Unlike other marginalised groups, children are often not in a position to enter into a dialogue with adults about their community needs and environmental concerns. The paper looks at recent attempts to increase public participation in local decision-making as well as proposing a typology of community action which recognises different ways in which children may be drawn into the process of neighbourhood renewal. It also offers a set of recommendations that, if taken up, will provide an agenda that will strengthen the social commitment of young people in general. It is assumed that participation offers "a way out of the problem of the "problematisation" of young people", especially in the context of neighbourhood renewal.

COMMUNITY CARE?

W. Hatchett

Public Finance, Oct.3rd-9th 2003, p.24-27

Since 1997 the Labour government has invested heavily in community regeneration through a plethora of area-based initiatives. However, improvements are not yet visible on the ground in many areas.

COMMUNITY RENEWAL AND MENTAL HEALTH: STRENGTHENING THE LINKS

M. Cameron and others

London: King's Fund, 2003

Practical guide to establishing partnerships between the statutory mental health services and the various other bodies and agencies involved in regeneration to ensure that mental health issues are included in the community revival schemes flourishing under the government's social inclusion agenda. Argues that money put into improved employment and training opportunities will be wasted if people are not motivated to access them because of stress and depression.

'DESIGN-LED' URBAN REGENERATION: A CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE

D. Bell and M. Jayne

Local Economy, vol.18, 2003, p.121-134

Paper develops a critical perspective on the ways in which "design-led" urban regeneration has been undertaken in local and regional economies in the UK. Strategies aimed at economic and social regeneration now routinely include design, although it remains a fuzzy concept. Paper begins by offering a definition of design, which is then used to assess a number of local and regional "design-led" urban regeneration schemes. A more detailed critique of one such project, the North Staffordshire Design Initiative, is then undertaken.

JOB CREATION IS CRUCIAL FOR REGENERATION, SAYS THINK TANK

R. Blitz

Financial Times, October 30th 2003, p.6

Gordon Brown's quest for economic prosperity in the regions will never be achieved unless he couples his productivity growth with new measures to create jobs in under performing parts of the country, Labours' leading think tank said today. Although there are wider productivity gaps in regions than employment disparities, people living in disadvantaged areas are more worried about jobs growth than how much more competitive the UK is compared to countries such as France, the Institute for Public Policy Research argues.

NEW DEAL FOR COMMUNITIES: THE NATIONAL EVALUATION: ANNUAL REPORT 2002/03

Neighbourhood Renewal Unit

2003 (Research report; 7)

Early indications are that the majority of the 39 New Deal for Communities partnerships are working well and starting to tackle deep-rooted problems with crime, education, health, employment and housing in their areas.

SEE YOU IN COURT

C. Baker

Axis, Sept./Oct. 2003, p.19

The article describes plans for the introduction of US-style community courts in England. Community courts in the USA aim to address defendants' problems holistically. This means that judges can sentence the offender to community service, drug treatment, mediation, job training or counselling.

URBAN RENAISSANCE? : NEW LABOUR, COMMUNITY AND URBAN POLICY

R. Imrie and M. Raco

Bristol: Policy Press, 2003

This book documents and assesses the core of New Labour's approach to the revitalisation of cities, that is, the revival of citizenship, democratic renewal, and the participation of communities to spearhead urban change. In doing so, the book explores the meaning and relevance of 'community' as a focus for urban renaissance. It discusses the conceptual and ideological contents of New Labour's ideas about community and, through the use of case studies, evaluates how far, and with what effect, such ideas are shaping contemporary urban policy and practice.

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