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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2003): Education - UK - Higher

DEGREES OF INEQUALITY

C. Ryan

Public Finance, Oct. 3rd-9th 2003, p.30-31

There is widespread opposition to government plans to allow universities to charge differential tuition fees. The government is seeking to defuse the row by proposing measures to widen access to higher education.

EARLY START

W. Berliner

Guardian Education, October 7th 2003, p.2-3

Children as young as three are being courted by a university in a radical development of the campaign to attract more students into higher education. Wolverhampton University has gone into partnership with a primary school in a deprived area of town, in an attempt to see whether more bright youngsters from working class backgrounds can be persuaded to consider university.

LEADING UNIVERSITIES 'COULD GO PRIVATE'

L.Lightfoot

Daily Telegraph, October 16th 2003, p.1

Leading universities are being forced to increase the number of overseas students to subsidise hone undergraduates and may end up as private institutions, vice-chancellors have said.

NO TOP-UP FEES AROUND HERE…

L. Hodges

Independent Education, October 2nd 2003, p.6-7

Students attending universities and colleges in Wales are subject to a different funding regime. Grants have been reintroduced and top-up fees have been postponed. Article looks at what this means for higher education in the principality.

PART OF MONEY FROM TOP-UPS MAY GO TOWARDS BURSARIES FOR POORER STUDENTS

W. Woodward

The Guardian, October 1st 2003, p.6

Universities could be required to give over a fixed percentage of the money they raise from top-up fees to student bursaries, to ensure that people from low-income homes pay none of the extra charges.

POOR STUDENTS MAY HAVE TOP-UP FEES PAID FOR THEM

M. Green

Financial Times, October 21st 2003, p.2

More than a third of students could have top-up fees paid for them under plans being considered by Charles Clarke, Education Secretary. Moves to offer extra help to the poorest 35 per cent could buy off critics on the Labour back benches, who say top-up fees will deter students from low-income families from going to university. Clarke says he is investigating ways to minimise the fear of debt for students from families that did not have a tradition of going to university. This would be paid for by a combination of government and university.

THE SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND DISABILITY ACT 2001 - THE IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION

M. Davies

Education and the Law, Vol. 15, 2003, p. 19-45

The article examines the responsibilities of higher education institutions (HEIs) following the Special Education Needs and Disability Act 2001. It begins by summarising the key provisions of the Act and defining the term "disability", before considering its implications in a variety of scenarios. It investigates reasonable adjustments that HEIs can make when encountering students (and employees) with disabilities as well as providing examples of situations where less favourable treatment is justified. Finally the article cautions against blanket responses to disability, encouraging instead innovation in teaching, practical classes, provision of course materials and support of students.

STUDENT RALLY OVER TUITION FEE INCREASES

N.Dyke

The Guardian, October 27th 2003, p.7

Thousands of students marched through London yesterday in protest at government plans to let universities treble tuition fees to £3,000 a year.

TESTS THAT DISCOUNT PRIVILEGE

L. Ward

The Guardian, October 15th 2003, p.6

Cambridge University today begins sifting applications as it prepares to put candidates through a new "thinking skills" test intended to reach beyond A-level scores and select those with the greatest potential. Cambridge can fairly claim a strong commitment to expanding access after instituting a range of measures including links with inner-city schools and summer schools for pupils.

TOP UNIVERSITIES 'SHOULD CHARGE UNLIMITED FEES'

R. Smithers and L. Ward

The Guardian, October 8th 2003, p.7

Britain's leading universities should be allowed to charge unlimited "top-up" tuition fees in a version of the US ivy league, a former head of an Oxford college told private school parents yesterday. Lord Butler of Brockwell also claimed it was not unreasonable for middle-class parents to contribute as much as £10,000 a year for their children's university education. He warned that the government's proposals to allow universities to charge up to £3,000 in fees from 2006 represented the worst of both worlds. Not only would they deter students from poorer backgrounds from applying to university, but they would also help to fuel the academic 'brain drain' from Britain by failing to raise enough to guarantee the future of top universities.

WE WON'T SCRAP GRANTS, SAYS NEW MINISTER

W. Woodward

Guardian, October 7th 2003, p.6

Universities will still be short of money even if the government pushed through its contentious plans for top-up fees, the Higher Education Minister, Alan Johnson, admitted yesterday. In his first newspaper interview Mr Johnson said he believed enough of the Labour MPs who have criticised proposals to allow universities to charge could be persuaded to back the government.

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