Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2003): Social Security - UK - New Deal

GETTING WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT RIGHT

J. Griffith

Working Brief, no.148, 2003, p.18-19

Argues that the welfare-to-work agenda should be broadened to include supporting the development of those newly in jobs. Support could include not only training opportunities but also careers advice and guidance, help with job search, and assistance with the development of soft skills.

THE LGA'S "HELPING THE HARDEST INTO WORK" COMMITMENT: OVERCOMING THE BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT

T. Rich

Local Economy, vol.18, 2003, p.174-175

Discusses how local authorities can work with other agencies to deliver local employment and training schemes, which are individually tailored to help those facing the greatest barriers to finding work. One innovative approach is use of welfare budgets to fund transitional employment projects.

(For case studies see Local Economy, vol.18, 2003, p.176-182)

LOCAL RESPONSES TO LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYMENT: DELIVERING ACCESS TO EMPLOYMENT IN EDINBURGH

C. Lindsay and G. Sturgeon

Local Economy, vol. 18, 2003, p.159-173

Edinburgh City Council has led the development of a range of policies targeting the long-term unemployed. Paper presents two case studies describing the development of innovative employment access initiatives in which the local authority has played a leading role, working in partnership with other local and national agencies and recruiting employers.

MENTAL HEALTH AND EMPLOYMENT

J.R. Ford

Working Brief, no.148, 2003, p.10-15

Reports on a brief qualitative study that investigated how practitioners are tackling the barriers that people with mental health problems face in accessing the labour market. The key findings of the study are that:

  • readiness to work should not be defined by a mental health label, but by the client's ability to operate in the workplace;
  • working in partnership with other agencies and pooling resources help to provide more holistic and effective services;
  • employers are hesitant about taking on people with mental health problems and lack understanding in dealing with current employees with such difficulties;
  • the mental health employment field has been characterised by the patchy development of projects often reliant on short-term funding;
  • loss of benefits is a real barrier for people with mental health problems wishing to return to work.
Search Welfare Reform on the Web