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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2003): Social Care - UK

COUNCILS AND HEALTH BODIES PLAN TO REINVEST FINES TO IMPROVE SERVICES

N. Salari

Community Care, Oct.9th-15th 2003, p.20-21

The new system for fining social services departments for the delayed discharge of older people from hospital will come into force in January 2004. Councils say that they are pouring money from their own budgets into services for older people on top of the government's special delayed discharges grant in order to avoid the fines. Others are setting up pooled budgets with their local primary care and acute hospital trusts into which fines will be paid. This money will then be used to improve services and avoid further fines.

CRB CHECKS ON EXISTING CARE HOME STAFF

Anon.

Registered Homes and Services, vol.8, 2003, p.67-68

Following a consultation, government has announced that Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks on existing care home staff will be at the highest "enhanced level". This level includes use of conviction and non-conviction information held locally by the police to determine a person's suitability to work with vulnerable adults.

DEGREE OF HOPE

A.U. Sale

Community Care, Oct.2nd-8th, 2003, p.26-27

Discusses the launch of the new social work degree that will replace the Diploma in Social Work.

DIRECT PAYMENTS GUIDANCE: COMMUNITY CARE SERVICES FOR CARERS AND CHILDREN'S SERVICES (DIRECT PAYMENTS) GUIDANCE ENGLAND 2003

Department of Health

London: 2003

Guidance to assist local councils in making, managing and administering direct payments. Direct payments give recipients the opportunity to purchase care services instead of relying on council provision.

EXPLAINING ETHNIC DIFFERENCES: CHANGING PATTERNS OF DISADVANTAGE IN BRITAIN

D. Mason

Bristol: Policy Press, 2003

This book focuses on the changing terrain of ethnic disadvantage in Britain, exploring the diverse experiences of ethnic disadvantage and challenging common assumptions. It suggests that the increasing diversity of experience among ethnic groups is a key to understanding continuing and emerging tensions and conflicts, and includes:

  • up-to-date data and analysis of ethnic diversity and patterns of disadvantage in Britain;
  • coverage of key areas of social life, including demographic trends, education, employment, housing, health care, gender and policing and community disorder.

FEES PROTEST

Anon.

Registered Homes and Services, vol.8, 2003, p.69-70

There are reports that English Care, which represents owners of some 270,000 care beds in England, is considering a boycott of local authority funded care home residents in protest against low fee levels.

FORCING THE PACE

M. Wood

Community Care, Oct.16th-22nd 2003, p.56-57

The Scottish Parliament has placed a high priority on reforming social care, placing greater demands on local authorities and the voluntary sector.

HIGH AS KITEMARK

D. Brindle

Guardian Society, October 15th 2003, p.6-7

The author talks to Denise Platt about heading the new body that will monitor Social Care, the Commission for Social Care Inspection, when it starts work next April.

INTEGRATED WORKING: A NATIONAL INITIATIVE TO BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND PRACTICE

A. Crawford

Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 11, Oct. 2003, p.46-47

The newly established Integrated Care Network is a government sponsored initiative, which aims to promote integrated working in provision of health and social services.

IS COMPULSORY REGISTRATION THE KEY TO CRACKING THE CODES OF PRACTICE?

D. Craik

Community Care, Sept. 25th-Oct. 1st 2003, p.18-19

In September 2003 the General Social Care Council published codes of practice for all social care workers and their employers. Workers would have to abide by the codes or face being struck of a professional register launched in May 2003. The impact of the codes has so far been limited as so few social workers have registered.

JOINT REVIEWS: JUDGEMENT DAY AND BEYOND

J.C. Humphrey

British Journal of Social Work, vol.33, 2003, p.727-738

Joint Reviewers are the central regulators of local authority social services in England and Wales. Article focuses on ways Joint Reviewers formulate their judgements on social services, the impacts of those judgements, and the retrospective judgements about the costs and benefits of Joint Reviews made by local authority personnel. Concludes that Joint Reviewers are unable to shift the most fundamental problems afflicting social services departments, such as cultural maladies within local authorities, material inequalities between communities and inadequate resources for social care.

LEADING CHANGE IN HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE

V. Martin

London: RoutledgeFalmer, 2003

This book explores the need for individuals to engage in personal change through learning as an essential part of achieving change in organisations within health and social care settings. Key topics covered include:

  • contemporary models of transformational leadership
  • learning as the foundation for personal and organisational change
  • systems thinking as a way of understanding change in complex systems

PLATT OUTLINES HER PLANS FOR SOCIAL CARE'S NEW INDEPENDENT REGULATOR

L. Revans

Community Care, Oct.9th-15th 2003, p.18-19

Denise Platt, shadow chair of the planned Commission for Social Care Inspection, expects the new body to effectively champion service users. It will not, however, protect social workers, who need to speak up more effectively for themselves.

PROMOTING THE STATUS OF SOCIAL WORK: A CONSULTATION ON THE TIMETABLE TO IMPLEMENT PROTECTION OF THE TITLE "SOCIAL WORKER"

Department of Health and Department for Education and Skills

London: 2003

The proposed legislation will make it an offence for anyone in England and Wales to use the title "social worker" unless they are qualified to do so and are registered with the relevant social care council.

RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION FOCUS

Community Care, Oct.16th-22nd 2003, p.32-41

Looks at recruitment and retention problems in social care, including pay, use of locum social workers, and lessons from the private sector on how to become an employer of choice.

RECRUITMENT STILL A BURNING ISSUE AS LADYMAN BIDS TO DISMANTLE BARRIERS

D. Hayes

Community Care, September 25th-October 1st 2003, p.16

New Minister for Community Care Stephen Ladyman discusses how he intends to tackle recruitment problems in social care and how to support and reward existing staff.

SEEKING BETTER PAY EQUALITY

H. Eagleson

Professional Social Work, Oct.2003, p.18-19

"Agenda for Change" is a modernised pay system for all NHS staff except doctors and dentists. Article highlights the potential implications of this approach to pay for social workers.

SMALL BUT PERFECTLY FORMED

H. Mooney

Health Service Journal, Vol. 113, October 16th 2003, p.12

Bexley Care Trust will integrate health and social care for older and disabled people. There are now eight pilot care trusts in place across the country, and government is becoming concerned about lack of progress.

WHEN TWO BECOME ONE

D. Callaghan

Community Care, Sept. 25th-Oct 1st 2003, p.34-35

The article discusses different approaches to the integration of health and social care in Barking and Dagenham, Barnsley and Glasgow. Integration at chief executive level was recently dealt a blow by the acrimonious separation of the roles in Barking and Dagenham. In Barnsley a different approach has been taken, and a sophisticated commissioner/provider relationship has been developed to ensure joined-up services and a single point of contact for the user. In Glasgow, a joint general manager of learning difficulties services works across the boundaries of Glasgow Council, Greater Glasgow NHS Board, and Greater Glasgow Primary Care NHS Trust, and is accountable to a joint board.

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