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Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2003): Social Care - UK - Community Care

COMMUNITY CARE: CATASTROPHIC ACCIDENTS - FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR ONGOING CARE

Social Care Law Today, Issue No. 14, September 2003, p. 2-4

In Crookdale v Drury the court ruled that local authorities do not necessarily have to pay for the long-term costs of all catastrophic accident victims. Recent amendments to the National Assistance (Assessment of Resources) Regulations 1992 have meant that social services often have to shoulder the financial burden of providing long term care for serious accident victims. However, in Crookdale, the court held that where it is the best interests of the injured person to receive care that the local authority could lawfully decide not to provide, then the person who caused the injury should be ordered by the courts to bear the cost of providing that care.

THE MOTIVATIONS OF DOMICILIARY CARE PROVIDERS IN ENGLAND: NEW CONCEPTS, NEW FINDINGS

J. Kendall and others

Journal of Social Policy, vol. 32, 2003, p.489-511

Core motivations of providers revolve around combining a desire to meet the needs of their clients with seeking reasonable financial rewards. However many providers were frustrated and demotivated by poor relationships with local authorities commissioning care. Just under half of providers studied could be characterised as under-performing due to inadequate arrangements for feedback, the exercise of choice and recognition of their competence.

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