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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2004): National Health Service - Funding

CHANGE IS ON THE AGENDA: ARE YOU READY?

S. Brown

Primary Care Report, Vol.5, no.18, Nov. 26th, 2003, p.11-12

Discusses the impact of the new pay system to be introduced across the NHS in 2004 on primary care trusts. They will face increased staff costs as employers themselves, and will also have to meet their acute providers' increased pay costs indirectly through their local finance agreements.

NHS SURGEONS SET THE HIGHEST FEES FOR PRIVATE WORK

N. Timmins

Financial Times, December 29th 2003, p.1

NHS consultants are charging the highest fees in the world when operating in the private sector. The revelation will be particularly sensitive for the government as it comes at a time when the NHS has been paying surgeons private rates for extra work.

QUASI-MARKETS IN BRITISH HEALTH POLICY: A LONGUE DUREE PERSPECTIVE

M. Powell

Social Policy and Administration, vol.37, 2003, p.725-741

Paper examines quasi-markets in British healthcare from the 1930s to the present day. It shows there have been different forms of quasi-markets over time. It suggests a typology of quasi-markets based on hard versus soft, direct versus indirect, and internal versus external forms. It then applies these categories and conditions for success of quasi-markets to seven historical periods. Both the typologies and conditions for success varied over time, defying a simple linear development.

VICTORY FOR FOUNDATIONS, BUT AT WHAT COST?

S. Brown

Primary Care Report, Vol. 5, Issue 20, Dec. 10th 2003, p.7-8

Some of the new foundation hospital trusts will see an immediate increase in revenue income as a result of early entry into the new system of payment by results. However some of the financial benefits will be soaked up by rising costs.

WAIT FOR IT!

R. Siddall

Health Service Journal, vol. 113, Dec.11th 2003, p13

Extra funding for critical care services has been channelled into providing more high dependency, rather than intensive care beds. Consequently shortages of intensive care beds persist and experts are predicting a crisis this winter.

WHEN LESS IS MORE

J. Hirst

Public Finance, Dec.5th-11th 2003, p.24-27

There is great concern about the future costs to the NHS of treating chronic diseases caused by obesity and smoking. Government is responding with a range of health improvement measures aimed at reducing future demand. However, it shows little actual appetite for confronting the fast food and tobacco industries whose activities undermine good health.

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