Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2004): Care of the Elderly - UK

END OF CARE DIRECT NEARS AS DOUBTS AND CONFUSION SURROUND ITS REPLACEMENT

N. Salari

Community Care, Jan.22nd-28th 2004, p.18-19

Care Direct, a free telephone advice service for older people being piloted in the South West of England is to be wound up in March 2004. There is confusion about the new service that will replace it, known as Third Age.

FUNDING ISSUES HAVE FAR-REACHING IMPACT

I. Holden

Caring Times, Feb.2004, p.32

Article argues that current government policy for funding long-term care is flawed. It is leading to:

  • excessive costs for the organisation of domiciliary care;
  • older people who ought to be in residential care tying up affordable housing;
  • older people dodging payment for residential care by disposing of their main asset, their house, by giving it to their children while continuing to live in it.

HOME TO ROOST

H. Mooney

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Feb.12th 2004, p.12-13

Describes a scheme set up by Salford Primary Care Trust and the local acute trust to care for older people at home, avoiding hospital admission where possible.

PROGRESS TOWARDS PARTNERSHIP? THE DEVELOPMENT OF RELATIONS BETWEEN PRIMARY CARE ORGANISATIONS AND SOCIAL SERVICES CONCERNING OLDER PEOPLE'S SERVICES IN THE UK

K. Rummery

Social Policy & Society, Vol. 3, 2004, p. 33-42

The article reviews the interim results of a three-year longitudinal study, which is examining progress towards partnership working between the new Primary Care Organisations and local authority social service departments. An evaluation framework from the Nuffield Institute for Health is used to examine the results. Areas covered include the need for partnership, commitment and ownership of the partnership, the development and maintenance of trust and the establishment of clear partnership arrangements. The article concludes that progress towards partnership has been variable and that there has been a lack of tangible benefits for users and carers.

PULLED IN ALL DIRECTIONS

L. Lees

Community Care, Feb.5th-11th 2004, p.40-41

Intermediate care co-ordinators have been introduced by primary care trusts to deliver government targets set by the National Service Framework for Older People and the NHS Plan. They operate at the interface between health and social care. Article discusses how their role is developing across England.

SENIOR AND HEARD

M.-L. Harding

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Feb.12th 2004, p.32-33

Describes an older people's service development scheme in London, which targets people over 75 who are regularly admitted to hospital. The scheme co-ordinates care across disciplinary boundaries to help these people manage their condition better and so reduce demand for acute care. Hospital admissions among older people helped by the scheme dropped by 47%.

WHEN IT'S GONE, IT'S GONE!

J. Burton

Caring Times, Feb.2004, p.22-23

The administrative and regulatory burden laid on residential care homes is driving many small providers out of business.

WHICH WAY NOW?

M. Lake

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Feb.12th 2004, p.18-19

Argues that the NHS must focus on promoting health and well-being in older age, and not simply on creating more efficient mechanisms for responding to crises. The challenge is to manage the increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses, and to prevent avoidable decline into dependency and ill health.

WHO ARE THE REAL EXPERTS?

K. Sumner

Community Care, Jan.29th-Feb.4th 2004, p.32-34

Discusses ways of engaging older people in social care research, policy development and service planning.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web