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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2004): Social Security - UK - New Deal

GETTING JOBS: HARDER FOR SOME

D. Simmonds

Working Brief, issue 151, 2004, p.10-13

Argues that the existing New Deals need to be redesigned to help people with multiple disadvantages into work. Disadvantaged people need to be motivated to persist in seeking work. Personalised support is helpful, as is a good relationship between Jobcentre Plus staff and local employers. Unemployment blackspots need to be tackled through a coherent local regeneration plan.

IMPORTING WORKFARE: POLICY TRANSFER OF SOCIAL AND LABOUR MARKET POLICIES FROM THE USA TO BRITAIN UNDER NEW LABOUR.

A. Daguerre

Social Policy and Administration, vol.38, 2004, p.41-56

Article examines the pattern of policy transfer in the area of active labour market policy from the USA to Britain between 1996 and 2002. It proposes a framework for understanding the Americanisation of British social policy. The pertinent factors identified include a shared work ethic culture that holds individuals responsible for their own fate and downplays the importance of societal factors such as lack of employment opportunities. The principle that aid must be temporary and that recipients must be monitored regularly by the public authorities is central to both American and British welfare reform. Policy transfer is also facilitated by similarities in labour market structure. There is acceptance in both countries of a flexible and deregulated labour market with the capacity to create low-skill jobs, especially in the service sector.

JOBCENTRE PLUS AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES WORKING TOGETHER

N. Branoski

Working Brief, Issue 151, 2004, p.14-15

In Spring 2003 the Department for Work and Pensions, Jobcentre Plus and the Local Government Association came together to sign an agreement to work together at the local level to help people with multiple disadvantages into work. Article outlines how the agreement should operate.

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