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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2004): National Health Service - Primary and Community Care

A&E STAFF GIVEN 36-LANGUAGE PHRASEBOOK

J. Meilke

The Guardian, February 19th 2004, p.7

NHS accident and emergency staff are being given a phrasebook to help them communicate with the increasing number of patients who speak little or no English.

BREATH OF FRESH AIR

C. Lewis

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Feb.12th 2004, p.30-31

The government's vision for community pharmacists sets out essential, enhanced or supplementary services they could provide. Some pharmacists are already training to be supplementary prescribers and planning specialist services. Supporters of the scheme hope that funds will be made available to primary care trusts for the development of the community pharmacists' role.

CHI: WHAT WE LEARNT FROM THE STAR RATINGS

V. Raleigh

Primary Care Report, vol.6, no.2, Feb.11th 2004, p.10-11

Discusses the limitations of the star ratings system in assessing the performance of primary care trusts.

FOUR IN TEN "CANNOT AFFORD TO GO TO THE DENTIST"

N. Martin

The Daily Telegraph, February 23rd 2004, p.9

A survey by a health insurance firm has shown that more than 25% of respondents could not afford dental treatment and almost a third had delayed treatment because they couldn't get an appointment out of office hours. A further one in five had postponed a visit because of their dentist's manner.

GOVERNMENTALITY BY NETWORK IN ENGLISH PRIMARY HEALTHCARE

R. Sheaff and others

Social Policy and Administration, vol.38, 2004, p.89-103

Using multiple case studies, article explores how clinical governance is affecting professional regulation and discipline in general practice. Finds that clinical quality is managed largely through semi-formal networks, relying on medical self-surveillance. Compliance is largely achieved by appeals to the legitimacy of clinical governance, but local GPs' leaders also argue that government might otherwise regulate medical practice more actively.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND SCHOOL NURSES: THE POTENTIAL FOR CHANGE

J.D. Bartley

Community Practitioner, vol.77, 2004, p.61-64

This qualitative research study carried out in Yorkshire in 2000 explored managers' and school nurses' perceptions of the latter's developing health promotion role. Managers were interviewed, and focus groups employed with school nurses. Managers and school nurses both wanted to develop the health promotion role, provide a needs-led service, and work with communities to target inequalities in young people's health. Future plans included a reduction in routine screening to enable an increase in innovative health promotion in and out of the classroom. School nurses and managers were committed to revolutionising the role of the school nurse and many felt that the adoption of a nationwide strategy was required.

HUNDREDS QUEUE AS SCARBOROUGH NHS DENTIST FILLS GAP IN MARKET

D. Ward

The Guardian, February 18th 2004, p.2

Describes stampede to register with a newly opened NHS dental surgery in Scarborough. Scarborough residents had not had access to dental treatment on the NHS for several years.

NHS "BROKEN DOWN" SAY DENTISTS WHO PREFER PRIVATE

J. Laurance

The Independent, February 19th 2004, p.7

Reports that only 44% of adults and 60% of children were registered with a NHS dentist in 2003. The shortage is exacerbated by the drift of dentists into the private sector.

(See also Financial Times, February 19th 2004. p.4)

NIGHT VISION

G. Clews

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Feb.19th 2004, p.14-15

Private providers are set to play a role in provision of primary care out of hours services as their new contract allows GPs to opt out.

THE ORGANISATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF PRIMARY CARE PHARMACY IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

J. Silcock, D.K.T. Rayner and D. Petty

Health Policy, Vol. 67, 2004, p.207-214

Primary care pharmacists in England attached to primary care trusts are involved in strategic budget setting, provision of prescribing advice to GPs and medicines management and review. Traditional community pharmacy faces many problems unless it can learn to develop alongside primary care pharmacy.

PCTS FACE A RACE AGAINST TIME AS THE NEW YEAR KICKS IN

A. Elliott

Primary Care Report, vol. 6, no.1, Jan.28th 2004, p.4-6

Discusses the challenges primary care trusts face in 2004 to implement the new GP contract, reform of out-of-hours services, and introduce patient choice and the new financial flows regime.

PLAY TO THE STRENGTHS OF YOUR CLINICIANS

J. Shapiro

Primary Care Report, vol.6, no.2, Feb.11th 2004, p.12

Discusses the part that clinicians can play in managing primary care trusts through the professional executive committee.

POWER TO THE PEOPLE

J. Davies

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Feb.19th 2004, p.10

Discusses an attempt by a community-owned mutual organisation, Standish Mutual Care, to take over a disused NHS hospital and turn it into a mixed-use health and social care facility, offering a range of services including physiotherapy, x-ray and imaging, key-worker housing, a high dependency nursing unit and residential accommodation for older people.

TIES THAT BIND

G. Clews

Health Service Journal, vol. 114, Feb.26th 2004, p.10-11

The arrival of foundation trusts will profoundly change the relationship between commissioning primary care trusts and hospitals. Service level agreements will be replaced by legally binding contracts based on fixed tariffs for treatments.

TYING THE STRANDS OF HEALTH REFORM TOGETHER

B. Ricketts

Primary Care Report, vol. 6, no.1, Jan.28th 2004, p.22-23

The implementation of patient choice by primary care trusts is being supported by a number of key policy changes within the NHS, including:

  • introduction of diagnosis and treatment centres to increase capacity;
  • electronic booking of appointments;
  • payment of hospitals by results to increase efficiency.
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