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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2004): Social Care - Overseas

PRO-MARKET, NON-MARKET: THE DUAL NATURE OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE IN SOCIAL SERVICES DELIVERY

D. Baines

Critical Social Policy, vol.24, 2004, p.5-29

Discusses the impact on new public management on delivery of social care in Canada. Elaborates some of the pro-market, non-market processes that dominate both state-run and non-profit sectors of Canadian social services. These processes are pro-market in that they support, extend and legitimise private provision. They are at the same time non-market, in that while they produce savings for the state, they do not generate profits. Special attention is paid to two processes of particular significance in deskilling and disciplining social workers, namely mandatory licensure and narrow specialisation arising from rationalisation of services.

SOCIAL AND HEALTH-CARE PRIORITIES OF LOCAL POLITICIANS IN FINLAND: DO THE ATTITUDES OF POLITICIANS REFLECT THE ACTUAL PROCESSES IN MUNICIPALITIES?

J. Lammintatianen and J. Kinnunen

International Journal of Social Welfare, Vol. 13, 2004, p.69-76

Study investigated whether elected politicians' attitudes influenced actual resource allocation. Health and social care expenditure in Finnish municipalities in the 1990s was compared to earlier studies of politicians' attitudes to healthcare prioritisation. Found that, contrary to expectations, expenditure on secondary care increased during this period, while fewer resources were allocated to primary and preventive services.

WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO CONTINUITY IN HOME CARE? PERSPECTIVES OF KEY STAKEHOLDERS

C. A. Woodward and others

Social Science & Medicine, Vol. 58, 2004, p. 177-192

The article explores the importance of continuity in community care in Ontario and the factors that contribute to it. Interviews took place with home care clients and their caregivers, workers in the home care system and physicians. Lack of consistency in both personnel and the timings of visits emerged as the main barriers to continuity of care. Clients also considered consistent knowledge and skills in workers and trust as essential components in achieving continuity, while managers valued care planning, monitoring and co-ordination. The article concludes that to ensure continuity of care attention must be paid to both the management of care and its delivery.

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