Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2004): Care of the Elderly - Overseas

THE MADRID INTERNATIONAL PLAN OF ACTION ON AGEING: FROM CONCEPTION TO IMPLEMENTATION

A. Sidorenko and A. Walker

Ageing and Society, Vol. 24, 2004, p.147-165

The Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing (MIPAA) was developed by the United Nations to guide international policy on ageing through the 21st century. The paper outlines the process through which the plan was developed and explains its structure and major features. It contrasts the Madrid Plan with the previous Vienna Plan, identifying the former's focus on ageing in developing counties as the key difference between them. It finally presents a model for use in evaluating the impact of the plan.

TOWARDS INTEGRATING HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE: A EUROPEAN REVIEW

J. Billings, A.M. Alaszewski and K. Coxon

Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 12, Feb. 2004, p.3-8

The paper provides a European overview of alternative approaches to integrated care for older people, drawing on the findings of a wider European project entitled PROCARE. Fragmentation of service delivery into competing health and social care organisations is a characteristic shared by all countries. Structural change, i.e. the creation of single agencies providing both health and social care is one possible solution. Another approach is to focus on integration of care activities by interdisciplinary teams. A third model focuses on the provision of person-centred seamless or continuous care, and is typified by the Skaevinge 24-hour health and care scheme in Denmark.

A WORLD GROWING OLD

J. Seabrook

London: Pluto Press, 2004

This book reflects on some of the unresolved questions of ageing. In the West, will an ageing population be sufficiently robust to contribute to the prosperity of the economy, or will it place intolerable strains on both services and society? In the South, can the rising number of elderly be absorbed by the traditional social safety net of the family, or will industrialisation rob them of that security? In the great drama of globalisation, are the growing populations of elderly gainers or losers? Are we confronted by a 'demographic time bomb' or an unparalleled opportunity to make use of the experience and knowledge of the years?

Search Welfare Reform on the Web