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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2004): Care of the Elderly - UK

BRINGING HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE TOGETHER FOR OLDER PEOPLE: WILTSHIRE'S JOURNEY FROM INDEPENDENCE TO INTEGRATION

R. Jones

Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 12, Feb. 2004, p.27-32

During the past 10 years, Wiltshire has moved from independent health and social care services to integrated services with single management of health and social care local teams. The sequence has been co-location, followed by common single management, followed by an aspiration to move to one organisation.

THE COSTS OF CARE

R. Holmes and K. McMullen

Coalition on Charging, 2004

The study found that many older and disabled people have to pay for essential home care services out of their benefits. Many now have no choice but to reduce the level of services they receive.

LACK OF NATIONAL GUIDANCE BLAMED FOR DELAYS TO SINGLE ASSESSMENTS

D. Hayes

Community Care, Mar. 18th-24th 2004, p.16-17

There is concern that many areas of England will fail to meet government's deadline for introducing the single assessment process for older people from April 2004. Delays may be caused by the government's decision to allow local authorities to develop their own systems rather than imposing a single national standard. There is much uncertainty about how the single assessment process will work in practice, and whether that will tally with the paper-based or electronic management systems being developed.

MINSTER FORECASTS DECLINE IN CARE HOME PLACES

N. Timmins

Financial Times, March 22nd 2004, p.3

The number of residential care home places is set to fall, at least as a proportion of the care market, as older people demand more independence and control over their lives, Stephen Ladyman, the Health Minister, has predicted. More older people would demand care in their own homes, and "extra care" housing - forms of sheltered housing where residents had their own front door but high levels of domiciliary care and support and access to communal facilities and alarm systems - was set to become "the dominant form of residential care in the future", he said. He warned the residential care home business that too much of it still had the workhouse mentality, where older people were seen as "a commodity to be managed until they die".

OLD PEOPLE 'BEING ROBBED OF WILL TO LIVE' BY LONELINESS

A. Akbar

The Independent, March 8th 2004. p.8

Thousands of old people die alone in their homes every year without being noticed, a survey reveals today. It says Britain's aging population is "losing the will to live" through a lack of personal contact with friends or visitors. The survey, undertaken by the Women's' Royal Voluntary Service, found that 12, 000 older people in Britain died alone in their homes every year.

SOCIAL WORK, GENERAL PRACTICE AND EVIDENCE-BASED POLICY IN THE COLLABORATIVE CARE OF OLDER PEOPLE: CURRENT PROBLEMS AND FUTURE POSSIBILITIES

K. Kharicha and others

Health and Social Care in the Community, Vol. 12, 2004, p.134-141

The article questions whether collaborative working between social services and primary healthcare actually benefits patients and the wider community. It begins by summarising the policies behind collaborative working before looking at the different models of collaborative working and considering the impact of the policy on professionals. Outcomes for service users are then examined. It concludes that there is insufficient evidence to show that formal collaborative arrangements work better than those forged informally. A number of process measures for further evaluation are recommended.

SUPPORTING INDEPENDENCE: THE EMERGING ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

K. Doughty

Housing, Care and Support, vol.7, Feb.2004, p.11-17

Describes how suitable assistive technology in combination with community care services can help frail older people remain in their own homes.

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