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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2004): Services for the Disabled - UK

AGENCIES UNITED

D. Abbott, D. Watson and R. Townsley

Community Care, Mar. 4th-10th 2004, p.34-35

Research shows that multi-agency working is having a positive impact on disabled children with complex health care needs, their families, and the professionals that support them. Multi-agency services which address the social and emotional needs of families and their disabled children can make a significant difference.

PASSPORT TO INDEPENDENCE?

D. Vale

Community Care, Mar. 4th-10th 2004, p.32-33

The article reports research showing that registered blind and partially sighted people are not being offered the social care and rehabilitation services they need. It highlights problems with supply of equipment such as white canes and liquid level indicators, which can help prevent scalding.

PREPARING YOUNG ADULTS WITH DISABILITY FOR EMPLOYMENT

B. J. Taylor, S. McGilloway and M. Donnelly

Health and Social Care in the Community, Vol. 12, 2004, p.93-101

The article evaluates the Vocational Opportunities in Training for Employment (VOTE) initiative in Northern Ireland. The initiative aims to provide employment training and support for vulnerable young adults with a range of disabilities, and the article explores the extent to which it creates training opportunities and promotes inclusive working partnerships. A combination of documentary analysis and semi-structured, face-to-face, interviews with young people taking part in four projects throughout the Belfast area, was used to gather data. In general VOTE was viewed in a positive way and was successful in developing the young adults' social and employment skills and enhancing their employment prospects. Several factors important for the success of the initiative are noted, including liaison with parents, addressing employers' concerns and effective partnership working. The article concludes that the initiative had been a success but that the next step needs to be integration of specialised training and support with mainstream employment.

WORKING LIVES: THE ROLE OF DAY CENTRES IN SUPPORTING PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES INTO EMPLOYMENT

S. Beyer and others

London: Department of Work and Pensions, 2004 (Research report; no. 203)

The research explored, through interviews with day centre users and their carers, the employment related activities offered by the centres and other organisations. It aimed to show how people with learning difficulties can be most effectively helped into employment. It found that day centres varied greatly in the emphasis they placed on achieving paid employment outcomes. The smallest group of day services provided little or no employment-related activities and referred on to specialist agencies for most aspects of employment work. The largest group used systems of work skill assessment and formal work preparation, but it was unclear how this led on to paid jobs. A third group had their own employment placement teams and supported people into paid work.

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