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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2004): Education - UK - Higher

THE CHEMISTRY OF CLOSURE

J. Crace

Education Guardian, March 23rd 2004, p.2-3

When chemistry departments are disappearing (and physics, languages and sociology), the Chancellor's budget pledge to increase higher education funding has come too late to prevent courses closing at universities across the country. The article looks at which subjects are being hit and asks whether the country can afford to lose this scholarship.

COLLEGE CONCESSIONS FOR STATE STUDENTS REJECTED

M. Green

Financial Times, March 22 2004, p.6

Universities should take information on a would-be student's background into account to "uncover hidden talent" but should avoid positive discrimination in favour of state school pupils. Professor Steven Schwartz, head of an independent inquiry into university admissions, has rejected the idea of favouring applicants from disadvantaged social groups as unfair and probably illegal.

'DUMBING DOWN' FEAR AS LEADING UNIVERSITIES AWARD MORE FIRSTS

L. Lightfoot

Daily Telegraph, March 16 2004, p.1

Universities were accused of being too lenient with students because of a steep rise in the proportion of first class degrees they award. The Russell Group of 19 research-led universities has increased the number by a half over the past five years. Lord Oakshott has written to Charles Clarke, the Education Secretary, asking him to explain the figures, which were provided in answer to a written Parliamentary question.

ELITE COLLEGE STRIVES TO WIDEN ACCESS

L. Ward

The Guardian, March 23rd 2004, p. 8

As Oxford revives entrance exams, a drive had been launched to sell the university to schools beyond its traditional hunting grounds. Admissions tutors face an uphill task: the proportion of state school entrants to Oxford dropped last year from 54% to 51% against a target of 69% set by the government's Higher Education Funding Council.

A LESSON FROM AMERICA

P. Lampl

Education Guardian, March 30th 2004, p. 23

Funding changes proposed for higher education don't go far enough, the author, a business entrepreneur and founder of the Sutton Trust, argues. To halt the decline of our universities, we need to look to the example of the US.

MANAGING SUCCESSFUL UNIVERSITIES

M. Shattock

Milton Keynes: Open University Press, 2004

This book seeks to define good management in a university context and how it can contribute to university success. It emphasizes the characteristics of university management, the need to be entrepreneurial, the importance of maintaining a strong academic/administrative partnership and a continuous dialogue between the centre and academic departments, and the need for the preservation of a self-directed institutional autonomy

WIDENING PARTICIPATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION FOR DISABLED STUDENTS

M. Taylor

Education and Training, Vol. 46, 2004, p.40-48

The article describes a three-year project led by Hereward College to increase the rates of participation by disabled people in higher education. Interviews were held to explore the barriers that disabled students encountered when considering higher education in order that the projects could begin to "close the gap" between further and higher education. A number of initiatives were introduced, including partnership days, a summer conference and summer school during the first year and insight weeks during the second. The project successfully increased the numbers of disabled students making applications to higher education, with an increase of 300% over three years.

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