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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2004): Social Care - Overseas

FUNDING RELATIONS BETWEEN NONPROFITS AND GOVERNMENT: A POSITIVE EXAMPLE

L. K. Brown and E. Troutt

Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Vol. 33, 2004, p.5-27

Canadian provincial governments are increasingly contracting out welfare service provision to non-profit organisations. The article uses the example of the Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP) in Manitoba to examine the ingredients of a successful approach to contract-based funding of voluntary organisations by government. It shows how investment in a long-term, trust based co-operative relationship underpinned by professional standards and a focus on a common mission can provide the impetus for a system in which high service standards are maintained, accountability is organic, and organisations feel supported in their work but not controlled.

WHOSE EMPOWERMENT AND INDEPENDENCE? A CROSS-NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON "CASH FOR CARE" SCHEMES

C. Ungerson

Ageing and Society, Vol. 24, 2004, p.189-212

The paper uses qualitative data from a cross-national study of "cash-for-care" schemes in five European countries (Austria, France, Italy, the Netherlands and the UK) to consider the concepts of empowerment and independence in relation to both care recipients and care givers. Each of the schemes has a different impact on the care relationship and on the labour market for care workers. In the Netherlands, where relatives can be paid, a fully comodified form of informal care has emerged. In Austria and Italy regulation is light and a mix of informal and formal care givers / care workers has emerged with many migrants entering the field. In the UK, direct payments allow care recipients to employ local workers who deliver care for various lengths of time. On the other hand in France a credentialised system means that care is delivered by qualified workers for very short periods.

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