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Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2004): National Health Service - Primary and Community Care

ADOPTING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES

S. Forester

Community Practitioner, Vol. 72, 2004, p.140-145

The paper reports on some aspects of a study that explored the experiences of 11 health visitors who had adopted community development approaches in their work. It places the study in the context of debates about the nature of public health, and the need to deliver services that effectively address inequalities in health, strengthen the public health function of health visiting and promote public participation and multi-agency working.

AUTONOMY AND MODERNISATION: THE MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE IN AN ENGLISH PRIMARY CARE TRUST

R. McDonald and S. Harrison

Health and Social Care in the Community, Vol. 12, 2004, p.194-201

Recent New Labour policy for the modernisation of government places emphasis on decentralisation. However, primary care trusts are also subjected to a raft of centrally established performance targets and indicators. This raises the question of the extent to which managers can truly exercise autonomy in the context of rigid government directives. The paper presents findings from a study using participant observation and interviews to examine the impact of a training course aimed at increasing autonomy for middle managers in an English PCT.

A BAD FIT: THE GP CONTRACT THAT DOESN'T MEASURE UP WITH PCTS

J. Davies

Health Service Journal, Vol. 114, Apr. 8th 2004, p.10-11

The new GP contract is intended to underpin the modernisation of primary care, but continuing local disputes over the detail is putting relations between practices and their primary care trusts under strain.

BEST PRACTICE?

C. Meek

Health Which? Apr. 2004, p.10-13

Cardiac arrest survival would be markedly improved if ambulances reached and defibrillated patients in less than eight minutes. Response times in England are still too long, and survival rates much lower than in the best areas of Canada and the USA.

THE CHANGING FACE OF THE PROFESSIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

N. Smith

Primary Care Report, Vol. 6, No. 5, Mar. 25th 2004, p.18-19

The article discusses the benefits offered by the presence of an increasing number of pharmacists on professional executive committees of primary care trusts.

CRISP PROMISES MORE POWERS FOR PCTS IN LEADERSHIP DRIVE

N. Smith

Primary Care Report, Vol. 6, No. 5, Mar. 25th 2004, p.4 and 6

In future, primary care trusts may be star-rated on the basis of a handful of national priorities, locally set targets (with funds to support them) and service improvements that will take into account trusts' individual circumstances.

THE LATE SHOW

C. Lewis

Health Service Journal, Vol. 114, Apr. 8th 2004, p.28-29

The new GP contract is expected to be a catalyst for nurse prescribing. With most GPs choosing to exercise their right to opt out of out-of-hours care, nurse prescribing will be a key part of establishing the new multidisciplinary teams that will provide cover. Factors hindering progress include nurse shortages and limitations of the independent formulary.

THE NEW HEALTH VISITING: THRIVING AT THE EDGE OF CHAOS

N. Brocklehurst

Community Practitioner, Vol. 77, 2004, p.135-139

Concepts from chaos and complexity theory are used to help frame and understand some of the challenges facing health visitors as the profession struggles to come to terms with a rapidly changing policy environment. The complex relationship between health visiting, nursing and the state is explored, and a number of suggestions are made to restore the sense of trust that appears to have been lost in this relationship in recent times. It is concluded that the profession must change and adapt in order to survive.

AN OPPORTUNITY FOR COMMUNITY NURSES

E. White

Community Practitioner, Vol. 77, 2004, p.129-130

Summarises the key principles of the new General Medical Services Contract for GPs and its implications for nurses.

PCT/PRIMARY CARE REFERRALS: CURRENT AND FUTURE TRENDS

G. Rowlands and others

British Journal of Health Care Management, Vol. 10, 2004, p.110-115

The article presents results of the first published survey of primary care trusts' current activities and future plans around collecting and using GP referral data. There is much variation in the type and quality of referral data collected by PCTs. However several common approaches to managing the referral process emerged, including:

  • the appointment of referrals advisors;
  • the development of GPs with "special interests";
  • the use of multidisciplinary specialist clinics

QUICKER TREATMENT CLOSER TO HOME: PRIMARY CARE TRUSTS' SUCCESS IN REDESIGNING CARE PATHWAYS

Audit Commission

Audit Commission Publications, 2004

The study reviews how primary care trusts (PCTs) are supporting the redesign of care pathways from primary care into consultant outpatient services. Its aim is to help PCT managers understand which organisational and contextual factors have a particular impact on a PCT's ability to progress successful redesign programmes and how some PCTs have overcome local barriers to implement new care pathways. Redesign helps to ensure that patients are treated by the most appropriate healthcare professional in the most appropriate location. This improves the patient experience (for example by reducing waiting times), helps to reduce demand for acute care, and introduces a greater range of providers, thus supporting patient choice.

RESPIRATORY DISEASE BRIEFING

F. Robinson

Community Practitioner, Vol. 77, 2004, p.131-132

There are strong financial incentives in the new General Medical Services contract for GP practices to improve the management of patients with chronic respiratory disease. The article discusses the use of written self-management plans for asthma patients and gives examples of innovative and collaborative practice.

THE TOOTH FERRY FILLS GAPS IN NHS

S. Lister

The Times, April 15th 2004, p.3

A shortage of health service dentists has led Isle of Wight residents to sail for treatment in France. Under the scheme, organised in conjunction with the French authorities, a group of patients will pay £120 for travel and treatment.

TRANSFORMING PRIMARY CARE: THE ROLE OF PCTS IN SHAPING AND SUPPORTING GENERAL PRACTICE

Audit Commission

Audit Commission Publications, 2004

The study reviews primary care trusts' (PCTs) readiness to become proactive commissioners of primary care. It aims to help PCT managers to maximise the benefits of the new national contract with GPs implemented in April 2004 and which will be supported by additional planned investments of £1.9bn in primary care in the UK.

THE VISION THING

B. Page

Health Service Journal, Vol. 114, Apr. 15th 2004, p.14-15

For patient choice to work in the NHS, the willing co-operation of GPs is essential. Their role will be to offer patients reliable information, advice and guidance in making decisions about which hospital or treatment to choose

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