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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2004): Education - Overseas

ATTITUDES TOWARDS INCLUSION: THE CASE OF ISRAELI AND PALESTINIAN REGULAR AND SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

H. Lifshitz, R. Glaubman and R. Issawi

European Journal of Special Needs Education, vol.19, 2004, p.171-190

Found that Israeli teachers were significantly more willing to include children with special needs than their Palestinian counterparts. Israeli teachers are more likely to be oriented towards developing the potential of individual pupils, leading to a progressive attitude towards inclusive education. Palestinian teachers are more conservative and oriented towards helping their people grow into a vibrant and strong nation. The intervention programme offered by the research team was effective in making the attitudes of both Israeli and Palestinian mainstream teachers more positive towards the inclusion of special needs pupils.

COMMERCIALIZATION OF RESEARCH: A CASE STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES

F. Zhao

Higher Education Research and Development, vol. 23, 2004, p.223-235

Many discoveries and inventions made by Australian universities have been lost offshore because they were not transferred effectively to Australian industry. Study addresses three main issues:

  • main policy changes affecting the commercialisation of Australian university research;
  • recent progress in research commercialisation;
  • key barriers to successful commercialisation.

Concludes that universities need more financial support from government, industry and other stakeholders and academics need to acquire business and management skills.

A COMPARISON OF THE LABOUR MARKET OUTCOMES OF POSTSECONDARY GRADUATES OF VARIOUS LEVELS AND FIELDS OVER A FOUR-COHORT PERIOD

D. Walters

The Canadian Journal of Sociology, Vol. 29, 2004, p.1-28

Although the evolving knowledge economy is widely believed to necessitate greater numbers of highly educated workers, there is little evidence to assess whether the relative employment outcomes of graduates with different types of post-secondary credentials have changed over the past few decades. The paper compares the employment outcomes of graduates over a four-cohort period between 1982 and 1995, using the National Graduates Survey. Results show that labour market outcomes remained stable during the period of investigation, suggesting that the knowledge economy has not benefited graduates in terms of labour market conditions.

CYBER SCHOOLS: AN EDUCATIONAL RENAISSANCE

G.R. Jones

New York: Ibooks, inc., 2004

In this book the author identifies several influences that are forcing change in educational institutions and considers how online learning and electronic delivery of information can be critical tools to assist educational, business and community leaders in making these changes. Also examines:

  • the rising costs of education;
  • the changing characteristics of the adult student;
  • the development of a global learning community;
  • the transformation of the world into a knowledge society;
  • how the Internet and television can provide a less costly and more efficient means of providing education to a diverse student population.

DOES EDUCATION REDUCE WAGE INEQUALITY? QUANTILE REGRESSION EVIDENCE FROM 16 COUNTRIES

P.S. Martins and P.T. Pereira

Labour Economics, Vol. 11, 2004, p.355-371

The paper presents empirical findings concerning returns to education across the wage distribution. Results showed that returns to schooling were higher for individuals with greater skills, suggesting that schooling has a positive impact on within-levels wage inequality. There may be several reasons for this, including over-education, ability-schooling interactions and school quality. The paper concludes by advising caution against policies aimed at cutting wage inequality by investing in the attainment of higher schooling levels, as a population made up of highly skilled individuals would, according to the evidence, still exhibit considerable levels of wage inequality.

IMPROVING ACHIEVEMENT IN LOW-PERFORMING SCHOOLS: KEY RESULTS FOR SCHOOL LEADERS

R.E. Ward

Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin Press, 2004

How can multi-stressed, low performing schools overcome obstacles and respond to the unique learning needs of students? As accountability in schools becomes more crucial, educators are looking for comprehensive and innovative management practices that respond to challenges and realties of student academic achievement. In order to improve academic performance and the quality of instruction, the entire school community needs to be involved. Book provides six steps to overcome low school performance:

  • improving student achievement in the core subjects;
  • aligning teaching and learning with student performance;
  • linking professional development for all staff to the goals for students;
  • creating safe, clean and secure school facilities;
  • forging stronger links with parents, families and the community;
  • increasing management effectiveness, efficiency and accountability.

NEW BEGINNINGS

J. Crace

Education Guardian, May 18th 2004, p. 8-9

Article looks at Unicef's education programme for the Roma in Romania. At the moment only 61% of Roma children are in compulsory education, and in those primary schools where there are Roma children, nearly 70% of teachers are unqualified.

REFLECTIONS ON POLICY AND PRACTICE OF INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN PRE-PRIMARY SCHOOLS IN CYPRUS

P.Angelides, C. Charalambous and C. Vrasides

European Journal of Special Needs Education, vol.19, 2004, p.211-223

In 1999 the Cyprus Parliament passed the Education Act for Children with Special Needs, according to which all children have the right to be educated in their local mainstream school. Article examines how this policy is being implemented in early years settings and whether some children are still being marginalised. Found that children with special needs continue to be rejected by their peers. Teachers also value high-achieving, quiet children and do not respond positively to children who are different in any way.

STILL UNEQUAL AFTER ALL THESE YEARS

E. Dietrich

Education Guardian, May 11th 2004. p. 6-7

The author argues that 50 years on from a civil rights landmark, racial segregation remains embedded in the US school system.

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