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Welfare Reform on the Web (June 2004): National Health Service - Primary and Community Care

DO USE THE LIFT

J. Zitron

Roof, May/June 2004, p.33

The Local Improvement Finance Trust (LIFT) model is being used to upgrade NHS primary care facilities. It involves forming a joint venture company, owned partly by a private sector provider. The private provider also has a contract to develop and operate services. There is increasing interest in applying this model to small-scale housing regeneration schemes.

THE EVOLVING ROLE OF THE DISTRICT NURSE

P. Daniel and W. Hepburn

Community Practitioner, Vol. 77, 2004, p.172-173

The article explores how the involvement of district nurses in the National Health Demonstration Project in Paisley led to opportunities for them to develop the public health element of their role. Nurses were identified as "heart health nurse promoters" and became involved in a number of initiatives forwarding the project's aim of preventing coronary heart disease. These included community health checks, smoking cessation support services, heart health training and men's health services.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

H. Pauling

Public Finance, May 7th-13th 2004, p.28-29

The article describes the formation and development of two "partnerships" designed to deliver community health initiatives in deprived areas of London.

HALF OF DENTISTS CUT NHS WORK

S. Lister

The Times, May 26th 2004, p.11

More than half of NHS dentists are planning to reduce their work in the public sector or leave it for private practice because of their concerns about government reforms to dental services, according to the British Dental Association.

HEADS YOU WIN

C. Lewis

Health Service Journal, Vol. 114, May 20th 2004, p.30-31

Football clubs need cash and communities are short of sites for new health and social care facilities. Health initiatives can rent space from stadiums, benefiting both parties. The article describes a number of partnerships between NHS bodies and clubs.

IS PATIENT INVOLVEMENT POSSIBLE WHEN DECISIONS INVOLVE SCARCE RESOURCES? A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF DECISION-MAKING IN PRIMARY CARE

I.R. Jones and others

Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 59, 2004, p.93-102

The study explored the way in which GPs in the UK manage the dual responsibilities of treating individual patients and making most equitable use of NHS resources in the context of a policy of greater patient involvement in decision-making. GPs saw patient participation in decision making in positive terms, but for some involvement served an instrumental purpose, such as improving patient "compliance". GPs identified strongly with the role of patient advocate but experienced role tensions with respect to their wider responsibilities for budgets, populations and society in general. GPs generally agreed with the ethical principle of being explicit with patients, but found it difficult to put into practice. Limited availability of GP time played an important role in this theory/ practice gap.

PROPOSALS TO EXCLUDE OVERSEAS VISITORS FROM ELIGIBILITY FOR FREE NHS PRIMARY MEDICAL SERVICES: A CONSULTATION

Department of Health

London, 2004

The proposals aim to ensure that the NHS first and foremost benefits UK citizens and other permanent residents. Overseas visitors and failed asylum seekers would receive only emergency or immediately necessary treatment free of charge.

SEA FOR GP PRACTICE MANAGERS: LEVER OR LEMON

M. Boxall and L.M. Wallace

British Journal of Health Care Management, vol.10, 2004, p.138-142

Significant Event Audit (SEA) is a system of quality improvement through individual and organisational learning from daily experience. It facilitates service improvement through learning within an open and supportive environment and identifying any event from which quality improvement lessons can be learned. In this article seven GP practice managers share their early experience of using SEA.

STAR PERFORMER GETS TO GRIPS WITH PRIMARY CONCERNS

A. Mehellan

Health Service Journal, Vol. 114, May 20th 2004, p.14-15

Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic Health Authority serves a population with high levels of children and older people. This has led to large waiting lists for hospital treatment, high levels of emergency admissions and delayed discharges. The strategic health authority is now encouraging primary care trusts to put preventative measures in place to reduce demand for hospital care.

STREETS AHEAD

M. Gould

Health Service Journal, Vol. 114, May 13th 2004, p.30-31

The article presents some case studies showing best practice for primary care trusts attempting to reach out to, and get feedback from, their communities. Successful ideas include provision of multilingual information packs and moving health visitors out of GP surgeries into Sure Start offices.

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