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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 1999): Community Regeneration - UK

CONTINUITY AND CHANGE : A REVIEW OF ENGLISH REGENERATION POLICY IN THE 1990S

S. Hall and B. Nevin

Regional Studies, vol. 33, 1999, p. 477-482

The combination of the reform of the Single Regeneration Budget (SRB), the introduction of the New Deal for Communities and the results of the Comprehensive Spending Review have outlined the Labour government is approach to regeneration. This approach is partly based on continuity, particularly around the acceptance of the broad principles which underpin the SRB. However, in other areas there are clear changes in emphasis : distribution issues have become more important for government and there is a desire to improve the quality and effectiveness of local, regional and national strategies.

'THE POOR IN A LOOP IS BAD' : NEW LABOUR AND NEIGHBOURHOOD RENEWAL

B. Lund

Political Quarterly, vol. 70, 1999, p.280-284

People with low incomes tend to be clustered together on sink estates, thereby compounding their individual problems. Unless the processes which lead to this concentration of deprivation are tackled, social exclusion cannot be ended.

A REAL DEAL?

T. Dwelly

Roof, July/August 1999, p. 25-28

Article describes the implementation of the New Deal for Communities (NDC) in Manchester. The emphasis is on multi-agency working and community involvement. Aims to create three powerful new public agencies, a local housing company, a neighbourhood management board (a cross-tenure estate management board) and an education action zone. Action will be taken to reduce crime, and improve education, employment, healthcare, leisure and community facilities, and the environment.

WHERE ARE THE SOCIALLY EXCLUDED? CONTINUING DEBATES IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF POOR NEIGHBOURHOODS

P. Lee

Regional Studies, vol. 33, 1999, p. 483-486

Article sets out and discusses the findings of recent research into the identification of poor areas using the Index of Local Deprivation (ILD).

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