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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 1999): Services for the Disabled - UK

CRITERION THEATRE

P. Healy

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, August 5th 1999, p. 9-11

The Royal College of Nursing will be scrutinising criteria used by health authorities to decide who should get free nursing care in the wake of the Coughlan judgement. Full details will be passed to the Health Secretary in an attempt to put pressure on him to treat the need for new central guidance on who is entitled to free long-term NHS care more urgently.

PARALYSED WOMAN STOPS CLOSURE OF HOME

A. Frean

Times, July 17th 1999, p. 7

Reports Court of Appeal judgement that Mrs. Coughlan, a tetraplegic, is entitled to free nursing care because her primary need for accommodation is a health need, and her nursing needs not "incidental". The judgement states that where a patient's primary need for accommodation is a health need, the patient's nursing care is the responsibility of the NHS and not the local authority. However, the NHS has no "absolute duty" to pay for all long-term care.

(See also Daily Telegraph, July 17th 1999, p. 1; Health Service Journal, vol. 109, July 22nd 1999, p. 7; Registered Homes and Services, vol. 4, 1999, p. 33-36; Community Care, no. 1283, p. 10-11)

PRESSURE MOUNTS ON GOVERNMENT TO CLARIFY ARRANGEMENTS FOR LONG-TERM NURSING CARE

M. Hunter

Community Care, no. 1282, 1999, p. 4-5

Pressure is growing on the government to respond to the report of the Royal Commission on Long-Term Care after the Appeal Court decision in the Coughlan case created confusion over the funding of nursing care. The refusal of the Appeal Court to back the earlier High Court ruling that nursing care should be provided by the NHS rather than social services has resulted in a number of widely differing interpretations.

TARGETING THE POVERTY LINK

P. McCurry

Community Care, no. 1282, 1999, p. 14

Saving Lives, the white paper on public health, commits the government to addressing the link between poverty and poor health. Improvements are envisaged as being delivered through partnerships between Health Authorities and local government. There are concern that social services departments will be limited in their early contribution by a lack of resources and "initiative overload".

THE ROAD TO WELLVILLE

R. Lilley

British Journal of Health Care Management, vol. 5, 1999, p. 259-260

Proposes taking money out of the health budget to fund a proper health education programme. Thereafter, individuals who choose to pursue an unhealthy lifestyle should be charged for the treatment for the ailments it causes.

WATCHING EXPIRY DATES

M. Crail

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, July 15th 1999, p. 9-11

Reports wide scepticism that the measures proposed in the public health white paper will actually reduce health inequalities.

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