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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 1999): Mental Health Services - UK

BRIGHT FUTURES: PROMOTING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S MENTAL HEALTH

Mental Health Foundation

London: 1999

Covers promotion of children's mental health through the family, child care services and schools, and stresses the importance of early intervention. Finally covers services for children and young people experiencing mental health problems, including development and commissioning, interagency working, looked-after children, and the role of parents. Calls for specialist workers based in social services departments, child and adolescent mental health services and adult psychiatry to be linked-up with maternity and post-natal services. A network of accessible preventive and early intervention services should be created using children's services plans, and health and social services should jointly focus resources on mentally ill parents.

COMMUNITY CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES: SPECIALIST LEARNING DISABILITIES HEALTH SERVICES FOLLOWING RESETTLEMENT

N. M. Bailey and S. A. Cooper

British Journal of Learning Disabilities, vol. 27, 1999, p. 64-69

A survey of specialist health services for people with learning disabilities was undertaken by postal questionnaires to NHS Trusts in England and Wales. Thirty NHS Trusts had completed their resettlement programmes and their specialist learning disability services were analysed in detail and comparisons made with those which still retained placements in an institution. Results suggest that, when institutions close, the development of community health services has not been accompanied by the increase in resources one might expect.

A COMPARATIVE REVIEW OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE MODELS FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES: TOWARDS THE PROVISION OF SEAMLESS HEALTH CARE

D. M. Martin and A. Roy

British Journal of Learning Disabilities, vol. 27, 1999, p. 58-63

There is evidence that the health needs of people with learning disabilities can be well met by offering full health checks. Review looks at the way in which providers of primary and specialist services have attempted to meet the primary health care needs of the client group. The benefits of a number of models of primary health checks are scrutinised. User and carer involvement, specialist health service involvement, accessibility, comprehensiveness and effectiveness are compared and contrasted.

ENABLING GOVERNMENT: JOINED UP POLICIES FOR A NATIONAL DISABILITY STRATEGY

M. Howard

London: Fabian Society, 1999 (Discussion paper; 48)

Paper applies the 'modernising government' agenda to the social exclusion of disabled people, and shows how joined-up policies could be put into practice. Employs the latest thinking on improving government effectiveness to show how disability issues could be introduced at the heart of the policy process. Report builds on proposals for reform of local government to show how the quality of services offered to disabled people could be upgraded.

A GREATER EVIL

A. Eldergill

Guardian, July 20th 1999, p. 17

Attacks government plans to lock up people with severe personality disorders who have committed no offence as unjust and immoral. Proposes an alternative scheme under which a person would only be liable to be detained indefinitely if he had committed a violent or sexual offence, if a judge was satisfied that the public needed to be protected from serious harm, and if a jury was satisfied that the would commit further serious violence unless detained.

INTEGRATING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

L. Harrison

Managing Community Care, vol. 7, June 1999, p.15-25

Review of fourteen papers from localities throughout England outlining developments in collaborative approaches to mental health services.

IS COST A FACTOR II: A SURVEY OF PSYCHIATRISTS AND HEALTH AUTHORITIES TO DETERMINE THE FACTORS INFLUENCING THE PRESCRIBING AND FUNDING OF ATYPICAL ANTIPSYCHOTICS

G. Hogman and D. Taylor

London: National Schizophrenia Fellowship, 1999

Results show that 53% of psychiatrists are constrained on financial grounds from freely giving schizophrenia patients drugs which are widely considered to be more effective than traditional medication.

MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE MISUSE: A PRIORITY FOR POLICY AND PRACTICE

I. Barker

Managing Community Care, vol. 7, June 1999, p. 7-13

Despite policy statements and abundant evidence of the particular needs and problems of people with a dual diagnosis of mental illness and substance misuse, very little is being done for this group. Paper reviews the evidence and considers some of the solutions proposed.

OUTREACH EXCEEDS ITS GRASP

M. Muuen

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, July 22nd 1999, p. 18-19

Comments on the role of assertive outreach teams in mental health services. Assertive outreach can be conceived as controlling patients who are posing a risk by identifying them, gaining access, imposing treatment and forcing compliance. Alternatively, assertive outreach is seen as linking people to support services such as benefits, housing and treatment on their terms, but with limits to tolerance to ensure public safety. These two models are mutually exclusive, but, perversely, society wants them both.

QUALITY AND COSTS OF RESIDENTIAL SUPPORTS FOR PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES: SUMMARY AND IMPLICATIONS

E. Emerson et al

Manchester: Hester Adrian Research Centre, University of Manchester, 1999

Reports results of a large scale research project aimed at exploring the nature, quality and costs of residential or village communities and community-based dispersed housing schemes for people with learning disabilities. Results showed fewer people to be overweight in dispersed housing schemes. Residents had greater access to activities, which they used more frequently, and larger social networks, including non-disabled friends. More staff were on hand, environments were more homely, and residents took 50% less medication than those on residential campuses.

TOMORROW'S PEOPLE

M. George

Community Care, no. 1281, 1999, p. 28-29

Discusses the impact of the current review of the Mental Health Act 1983 on the role of approved social workers. Concludes that while the functions carried out by approved social workers are vital, local authorities and mental health professionals have work to do in convincing government that social workers are the right people to do the job.

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