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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2004): Services for the Disabled - UK

DISABILITY RIGHTS COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN 2004/05 TO 2006/07

2004

Reducing the employment gap between disabled and non-disabled people and ensuring equal treatment in accessing goods and services (including transport) are key planks in a DRC strategy document launched to make equal rights a reality for Britain's 10 million disabled people.

EUROPEAN YEAR OF DISABLED PEOPLE: REPORT OF THE SCOTTISH STEERING GROUP

Edinburgh: Scottish Executive, 2004

2003 was the European Year of Disabled People (EYDP). The report considers the programme of EYDPP activities funded by the Scottish Executive. It discusses the main activities in the work programme and how well aims and objectives were met. It reflects on what has been learnt from EYDP and how this informs priorities for future action.

IMPROVING THE LIFE CHANCES OF DISABLED PEOPLE: ANALYTICAL REPORT

Prime Minister's Strategy Unit, Cabinet Office

2004

The report identifies that around 10 million people in the UK are affected by disability, including 20% of the working age population, with trends suggesting this is on the increase. It finds that disabled people suffer adverse social outcomes, particularly at key transition points in their lives. These occur when they move between full-time education and employment or between employment and economic inactivity. Families with disabled children are also severely disadvantaged, with 55% living in or on the margins of poverty. While there are many successful government-sponsored services and policies in place, these can be fragmented.

WORKING PARTNERSHIPS: A CRITIQUE OF THE PROCESS OF MULTI-AGENCY WORKING IN SERVICES TO DISABLED CHILDREN WITH COMPLEX HEALTH CARE NEEDS

R. Townsley, D. Watson and D. Abbott

Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 12, Apr. 2004, p.24-34

With reference to findings from a three-year empirical study, the article examines some key elements of the process of multi-agency working in services for disabled children with complex healthcare needs. It concludes that good multi-agency working requires:

  • a clearly defined model to explain how the multi-agency process will operate;
  • a clear understanding of their entitlements and what they can expect from the service on the part of families;
  • provision of a single point of contact for families;
  • the ability to respond to families real, cultural and changing needs;
  • pooled budgets and dedicated resources for managing the project.
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