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Welfare Reform on the Web (July 2004): Social Housing - UK

HOUSING: IMPROVING SERVICES THROUGH RESIDENT INVOLVEMENT

Audit Commission

Audit Commission Publications, 2004

The report considers evidence concerning the costs and benefits of resident involvement in the delivery of social housing services. It concludes that:

  • involving residents to improve services does work and can provide value for money;
  • there are many good examples of housing associations building community capacity through resident involvement, but these gains are less obvious, tend to be over the longer term and usually involve a range of partner agencies;
  • involving residents in governance is often more challenging, especially if the organisation is not prepared for their involvement. In those circumstances the benefits might not translate into good value for money.

HOUSING SPECIAL

R. Winchester and others

Community Care, July 1st-7th 2004, p.26-33

The articles discuss the causes of friction between housing and social services, the role of housing in child protection and the work of housing associations in supporting vulnerable groups.

WHIRLWIND FOR CHANGE

N. Merrick

Public Finance, May 28th-June 3rd 2004, p.26-27

An interview with Zenna Atkins, the new chair of Places for People, the largest housing association in England.

NUISANCE NEIGHBOURS FACE COMPULSORY LIFE SKILLS LESSONS

A. Travis

The Guardian, June 1st 2004, p.1

'Neighbours from hell' will have to agree to take compulsory rehabilitation programmes under new government plans. The home secretary, David Blunkett, has acknowledged the criticism that evicting anti-social families and simply rehousing them means that somebody else gets the nuisance neighbour. Instead they will be expected to take courses in parenting skills, financial management, and anger management in return for another home.

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