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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2004): Child Welfare - Overseas

AFRICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN IN THE CHILD WELFARE AND KINSHIP SYSTEM: FROM EXCLUSION TO OVER INCLUSION

C.J. Smith and W. Devore

Children and Youth Services Review, vol.26, 2004, p.427-446

During the early years of the child welfare movement, African American children were excluded from the service, but by the 1970s were the most over-represented group in the system. Similarly, disproportionately large numbers of children of colour are currently placed in kinship foster care. In order for child welfare service providers to adequately comprehend the needs of these families, they must consider the impact of racism, poverty and sexism on them. They must also develop cultural competency in order to advocate effectively for disempowered groups and to work to preserve and enhance their ethnic identities.

RACE, ETHNICITY AND CASE OUTCOMES IN CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES

Y.E. Lu and others

Children and Youth Services Review, vol.26, 2004, p.447-461

Study reviewed the records of 3936 children and adolescents who were referred to the public receiving home for suspected maltreatment. Compared to census data, African American children were over-represented. Latinos, Asians and Anglos were under-represented. Significant differences were detected when race/ethnicity was analysed with respect to whether or not the case was opened for service, length of stay in foster care, and length of time for family reunification. African American children were consistently found in each outcome category in higher proportions than all other ethnic groups.

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