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Welfare Reform on the Web (August 2004): Education - UK - Training

ORGANISATIONAL LEARNING AND EMPLOYEES' INTRINSIC MOTIVATION

R. Remedios and N. Boreham

Journal of Education and Work, vol.17, 2004, p.219-235

The article examines whether changing working practices and organisational learning initiatives have an impact on employees' motivation. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were questioned as to their experiences of four new working initiatives. Results show that in general the initiatives did promote knowledge sharing and learning but also highlight that the way initiatives are presented is key to their success.

SHORT-TERM POLICY AND THE CHANGING INSTITUTIONAL LANDSCAPE OF POST-16 EDUCATION AND TRAINING: THE CASE OF LEARNING PARTNERSHIPS IN ENGLAND, SCOTLAND AND WALES

M. Ramsden, R.J. Bennett and C. Fuller

Journal of Education and Work, vol.17, 2004, p.139-165

Learning Partnerships were developed in 1998 to improve supply and demand decisions in post-16 education by encouraging joint planning between local partners. The article describes their development and analyses their success. It finds that although the Partnerships have been a success in Scotland, the experience in England, and to a lesser extent Wales, has not been so positive as strategic policy arrangements have continued to be a dominant force.

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF INDIVIDUALS' DISPOSITIONS IN WORKPLACE LEARNING: A CASE STUDY OF TWO TEACHERS

P. Hodkinson and H. Hodkinson

Journal of Education and Work, vol.17, 2004, p. 167-182

The article explores workplace learning by examining the relationship between individual learners' positions and dispositions, and their learning within the workplace community and practices. A case study of two secondary school teachers is used to illustrate these relationships.

WORK-BASED LEARNING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: "LEARNING TO LABOUR" AND THE NEW VOCATIONALISM IN ENGLAND

J. Avis

Journal of Education and Work, vol.17, 2004, p. 197-217

The article explores work-based learning in the context of current changes taking place in vocational education and training in England. It seeks to locate these within an understanding of the economy and the way in which work-based knowledge is constructed. It explores the policy concept of work-based learning and analyses the literature on, and young people's experiences of, the policy. It concludes that the underlying assumptions of work-based learning must be reviewed and spaces for progressive practice sought if the initiative is to move beyond simply being a form of occupational socialisation.

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