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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2004): Education - UK - Training

INTEGRATION VERSUS SEGREGATION: THE EXPERIENCES OF A GROUP OF DISABLED STUDENTS MOVING FROM MAINSTREAM SCHOOL INTO SPECIAL NEEDS FURTHER EDUCATION.

V. Pitt and M. Curtin

Disability and Society, vol.19, 2004, p.387-401

Although the latest education policy for disabled students in the UK is one of inclusion, some are moving out of mainstream schools into specialist colleges for their further education. Study used a combination of group and individual interviews to explore why the move away from mainstream education is made. Results show that students moved into specialist provision because of the inadequate physical accessibility of their mainstream colleges, the quality of disability services available to them, and their previous experiences whilst in mainstream school. Basically students participating in the research moved into specialist education because their local mainstream colleges were unable to cater for their needs.

LEARNING BY NUMBERS

N. Merrick

Public Finance, Aug.6th-19th 2004, p.28-29

From August 2004, further education colleges will be operating under a new system of plan-led funding. They will co-operate closely with their local learning and skills councils (LSCs) to deliver courses that the government and local learners desire. Colleges which fail to recruit as many students as forecast will no longer have money clawed back, and colleges with good results may be awarded extra funding by their LSC. Colleges with a good management record will also see the burden of regulation eased with the introduction of new light-touch audits.

NUMBERS AND NARRATIVES: WHAT CAN SCHOOLTEACHERS TELL US ABOUT COLLEGE DROP-OUT?

M. Page

Research in Post-Compulsory education, vol.9, 2004, p.239-247

The article explores the links between the schools that pupils attended before college and college drop-out rates. It found that schools where teachers had a clear understanding of further education, and were actively involved with their local colleges, had a lower college drop-out rate than those where further education was seen as second rate and university the only real option. It concludes that teachers must visit and make links with colleges and talk to staff and students about the college experience in order to stop negative attitudes about college. This should begin to lessen the high drop-out rate amongst students who have simply enrolled on the wrong course.

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