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Welfare Reform on the Web (September 2004): Social Care - UK

CONCEPTUALISING SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIPS

B. Dowling, M. Powell and C. Glendinning

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.12, 2004, p.309-317

Paper describes a literature survey which focussed on research examining the impact of partnership working in health and social services to assess the evidence concerning its effects and to investigate how partnership "success" is understood. The literature conceptualised the "success" of partnerships in two main ways:

  • process issues, such as how well the partners work together in addressing joint aims;
  • outcome issues, including changes in service delivery and subsequent effects on the health and well-being of service users.

The survey showed that research into partnerships has centred heavily on process issues, while much less emphasis has been given to outcomes.

FINE AND DANDY

B. Hudson

Community Care, Aug. 19th-25th 2004, p.38-39

The article reports on the proceedings of an event on reimbursement and delayed discharges organised by the Integrated Care Network. Delegates believed that reimbursement had created a largely positive effect and acted as a "partnership catalyst", thanks to sensitive implementation by the Department of Health.

MUST GET OUT MORE OFTEN

L. Lees and others

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Aug.12th 2004, p.22-23

Presents case studies showing how hospital trusts are dealing with the challenge of reducing delayed discharges in order to avoid financial penalties.

RING FOR SERVICE

N. Valios and K. Leason

Community Care, Aug.12th-18th 2004, p.26-28

Describes how Liverpool and Westminster have introduced call centres where customer advisers triage and appropriately refer on telephone enquiries to social services.

SPENDING REVIEW LEAVES SOCIAL SERVICES COUNTING UP FUTURE CUTS

C. Kenny

Community Care, Aug. 12th- 18th 2004, p.18-19

Local authorities warn that the 2.7% per year increase in funding for social services allocated in the Government's 2004 Spending Review is insufficient to cover rising costs. Shortfalls cannot be made up from council tax revenue as this has been capped. Cuts in adult services are predicted, unless local primary care trusts can help cash-strapped social services departments out financially.

THEY DIDN'T BUY

C. Seymour

Community Care, Aug.12th-18th 2004, p.32-33

A survey of social work students at Anglia Polytechnic University showed that the government's advertising campaign and new bursary scheme had been ineffective in attracting new entrants to the profession. Previous work experience was the biggest motivator, while the most common reasons for dropping out were the demands of the course and financial pressures.

WHY DON'T WOMEN WANT TO BE SOCIAL WORKERS ANY MORE? NEW MANAGERIALISM, POST FEMINISM AND THE SHORTAGE OF SOCIAL WORKERS IN SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS IN ENGLAND AND WALES

E. Hadlow

European Journal of Social Work, vol.7, 2004, p.167-179

The article examines why women are shunning social work as a profession - both through experienced workers leaving it and by potential recruits preferring other professions. Increasing managerialism, which reduces professional autonomy and the relational and caring aspect of practice, is found to be the primary reason for not retaining staff, whilst low pay and status, as well as increasing work opportunities for women, explain difficulties in recruitment.

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