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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2004): Care of the Elderly - UK

AGE DOES NOT COME ALONE: IDENTIFYING AND IMPLEMENTING OLDER PEOPLE'S VIEWS OF QUALITY IN HOME CARE SERVICES

N. Raynes

Quality in Ageing, Vol.5, June 2004, p.24-31

To obtain their definition of a quality service, older people were offered the choice of a home-based interview or participation in a focus group. Older people had a holistic perspective on what contributes to quality in a home care service and included access to transport, aids, adaptations and health care in their definition. They emphasized the importance of help with domestic chores. Following the collection of data on quality, a round-table discussion was arranged on how older people's views could become part of routine monitoring of home care services.

CRISIS? WHAT CRISIS?

N. Valios

Community Care, Sept. 18th-22nd 2004, p.34-35

The article discusses whether or not the costs of proving free personal care for the elderly will bankrupt Scottish local authorities as the population ages.

HEALTH AUTHORITIES BUNGLE PAYOUTS TO ELDERLY

J. Carvel

Guardian, Sept.17th 2004, p.10

Government has named and shamed health authorities which have missed the deadline for settling compensation claims from elderly people who were wrongly charged for care after being moved from NHS geriatric hospitals to nursing homes.

LINK-AGE UNRAVELS THE RED TAPE TO EASE ACCESS TO SERVICES

D. Hayes

Community Care, Sept. 2nd - 8th 2004, p.14-15

Introduces the Link-Age project, under which joint teams of pension service staff, social workers, benefits and financial assessments staff will identify needs and eligibility in a single visit to an older person's home. This will do away with the numerous visits separate services often undertake.

QUALITY IN HOME CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE: FACTORS TO PAY HEED TO

C. Patmore

Quality in Ageing, Vol.5, June 2004, p.32-40

The article discusses the influences of purchasers, providers and economic factors on the quality of home care for the elderly. Purchases affected service quality through the amounts of time they commissioned and whether they would purchase help for customers' quality of life as well as for their physical survival. Quality was also affected by whether care was purchased on the basis of fixed quantities of time or fulfilment of specific tasks. Providers influenced quality through their attitude to giving miscellaneous occasional help like changing light bulbs or finding reliable tradesmen. Some providers readily gave such help while others prohibited it on the grounds of risk. Quality of home care was also influenced by economic facts such as how local pay and conditions interacted with local labour markets, geography and demography.

SUPPORTING CARERS IN PAID EMPLOYMENT: DEVELOPING A NEEDS-LED APPROACH

D. Seddon and others

Quality in Ageing, Vol.5, June 2004, p.14-23

Interviews were conducted with staff from social services departments and voluntary organisations across Wales and with 46 family carers who were in paid employment. Findings suggest that flexible support, underpinned by partnerships between employers and staff from statutory and independent sector agencies, is the key to helping carers in employment. In order to provide such support an in-depth and holistic assessment of carer needs is required.

A YOUTHFUL STEP

J. Williams

Community Care, July 29th-Aug 4th 2004, p.38-39

The Welsh Assembly is considering establishing an Older People's Commissioner (OPC). The proposed functions of the OPC are to influence policy and service delivery, champion the cause of older people in Wales, offer information and advocacy, enforce older people's rights, and investigate complaints.

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