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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2004): Child Welfare - Overseas

CHALLENGING CHILDREN IN KIN VERSUS NONKIN FOSTER CARE: PERCEIVED COSTS AND BENEFITS TO CAREGIVERS

S.G. Timmer, G. Sedlar and A.J. Urquiza

Child Maltreatment, Vol.9, 2004, p.251-262

The study compares kin and nonkin foster parents' perceptions of their children's behaviour, their relationship with their children, and the stress they suffer caring for the children. It looks at the two groups' persistence with Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) and explores the barriers to treatment completion. Results showed that nonkin carers perceived their children's behavioural problems to be far more severe than kin caregivers, but also that they were much less stressed and were more likely than kin carers to drop out of the treatment programme. This is attributed to kin carergiver's greater emotional investment in their children, making them more vulnerable to distress, but giving them greater motivation to seek treatment for their charges. The authors conclude with a discussion on the implications of the study's findings for foster children's placement stability and long-term success.

CHANGING FACES: THE STORY OF THE CANADIAN STREET YOUTH SHELTERS

J. Karabanow

International Journal of Social Welfare, Vol.13, 2004, p.304-314

The article analyses the evolution of two Toronto youth shelters, Covenant House and Youth Without Shelter, in order to shed light on their relationship with the formal child welfare system. It concludes that both organisations have formed unequal partnerships with formal child welfare organisations. Identified as the weaker partner within this relationship, the shelters have become less an alternative haven for street youth, and more of a referral point for clients with whom the formal child welfare system does not want to deal.

THE EFFECTS OF EARLY PREVENTION PROGRAMS FOR FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN AT RISK FOR PHYSICAL CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT: A META-ANALYSIS

L. Geeraert and others

Child Maltreatment, Vol.9, 2004, p.277-291

The article examines whether early prevention programmes reduce abuse in high-risk families. Meta-analysis was performed on 40 evaluation studies with mostly non-randomised designs and showed that early intervention programmes do reduce abuse and neglect.

PERCEPTIONS OF CHILD MALTREATMENT BY PARENTS FROM THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT: CHALLENGING MYTHS ABOUT CULTURALLY BASED ABUSIVE PARENTING PRACTICES

S. Maiter, R. Alaggia and N. Trocmé

Child Maltreatment, Vol.9, No. 3, 2004, p.309-324

The article explores whether culture affects parents' views on what constitutes acceptable ways of disciplining a child and their definition of maltreatment. Twenty-nine South Asian parents living in Canada with children under twelve were questioned about their attitudes towards child discipline, maltreatment and neglect. Results show that South Asian parents do not differ significantly from other populations in their judgement of appropriate parenting approaches. However, the study did reveal a reluctance to contact child protection services if they encounter families struggling with abuse. The article concludes by discussing possible reasons for this.

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