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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2004): Education - Overseas

DEMOCRATIZING EDUCATION: A THEORETICAL CASE EXAMPLE OF INNOVATIVE PEDAGOGY WITH STREET CHILDREN

S. Grover

Journal of Children and Poverty, vol.10, 2004, p.119-130

Proposes an innovative programme for integrating street children into mainstream society by training them to be youth workers through a six-month post-secondary college level course. There would be no literacy or academic requirements for entry to the programme. During the course, the children would be given free board and lodging, the cost being covered by international development organisations. A small contingent of children trained as youth workers would be retained as permanent members of the college staff.

EVALUATING INCLUSION: AN EXAMINATION OF PARENT VIEWS AND FACTORS INFLUENCING THEIR PERSPECTIVES

Y. Leyser and R. Kirk

International Journal of Disability and Education, Vol.51, 2004, p.271-285

The article explores the attitudes of parents of children with moderate, mild and severe disabilities towards mainstream education. It found that in general parents supported mainstream education, although there were a number of dependent factors. These included the severity of their child's disability, the age of the child, the parent's education level and occupation and the extent of mainstream education. Parents were also concerned as to whether mainstream teachers had the skills necessary to instruct students with special needs, and whether their child would be socially isolated. Support for mainstream education was strongest from parents who had a college education and whose children were younger and had mild disabilities. The article concludes by discussing implications for practice and future research.

FACTORS UNDERLYING TECHNIKON AND UNIVERSITY ENROLMENT TRENDS IN SOUTH AFRICA

S.N. Imenda, M. Kongolo and A.S. Grewal

Educational Management Administration and Leadership, Vol.32, April 2004, p.195-215

South African higher education (HE) has two main strands - universities, offering undergraduate and post graduate degrees and technikons, offering technical and commercial courses focusing on specific career programmes as well as some degrees. Dwindling budgets have left African HE institutions struggling with declining enrolments. However, institutions that historically catered for black students are facing much graver problems than those traditionally catering for white students. The article investigates the factors that influence students when choosing an institution and explores ways in which historically black institutions can market themselves more effectively.

HIGH SCHOOL-AGED YOUTH'S ATTITUDES TOWARD THEIR PEERS WITH DISABILITIES: THE ROLE OF SCHOOL AND STUDENT INTERPERSONAL FACTORS

J. McDougall and others

International Journal of Disability, Development and Education, vol.51, 2004, p.287-313

The article explores the attitudes of high school students towards their disabled peers. Pupils in the 9th grade across 23 schools in Ontario, Canada, were questioned to establish their views on students with disabilities. Questions regarding school culture, for example teacher and student relations, inter-student relationships and school goal task structure, were also posed in order to identify any links between this and the students' attitudes. Results showed that the majority of students viewed their disabled peers in a positive light, although a significant number (21%) had a below neutral or negative attitude towards them. Positive student relationships and a school goal task structure that promoted learning and understanding rather than comparisons between students had direct associations with positive attitudes towards disabled students, and good pupil-teacher relations had an indirect effect through interpersonal support from teachers. The article concludes by recommending the development of ecologically based programmes aimed at promoting aspects of school culture that contribute to positive attitudes of students towards their disabled peers.

PART TIME POLITICS

B. Young and M. Brooks

Educational Management, Administration and Leadership, Vol.32, 2004, p.129-148

The article examines the experiences of part time teachers contributing to the flexible workforce in Alberta, Canada. It considers the attitudes and priorities of principals regarding part time workers, and the strategies part time teachers use in order to survive as flexible workers. It also identifies the micropolitical themes of power, perception, value and gender present in part-time teaching, which give insight not only into part time teaching, but into school organisations as a whole.

TALKING BACK TO NEW PUBLIC MANAGEMENT VERSIONS OF ACCOUNTABILITY IN EDUCATION

M. Court

Educational Management, Administration and Leadership, Vol.32, 2004, p.171-194

The article considers co-principalships in schools in New Zealand. Through a case study of a small, inner city primary school, it explores issues such as accountability and ultimate responsibility, and considers the skills and qualities required to make such a partnership work. It also highlights the benefits that such an arrangement can bring to schools, focusing particularly on the improved staff relations that can result from breaking down hierarchical barriers.

THREE BOLOGNAS AND A PIZZA PIE: NOTES ON INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF THE EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION SYSTEM

V. Tomusk

International Studies in Sociology of Education, vol.14, 2004, p.75-95

The Bologna Process was originally launched by a number of European governments and subsequently taken over by the EU with a view to creating a single, harmonised higher education market across all member states. Article looks at the history of the Process and its connection to the construction of a federal Europe, and analyses its three agendas:

  • cultural;
  • political;
  • economic.
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