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Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2004): Mental Health Services - Overseas

BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS

E. Gale, D. Krepaz-Keay and P. Farmer

Mental Health Today, June 2004, p.24-26

Reports headline findings from an international scoping review of programmes and interventions commissioned by the National Institute for Mental Health in England to inform its strategic approach to anti-discrimination work. The evidence supports six key principles that should underpin interventions to combat stigma and discrimination:

  • user/carer involvement;
  • national programmes should be supported by local activity;
  • programmes should address behaviour change;
  • clear messages must be delivered;
  • programmes should be monitored and evaluated;
  • programmes should be funded long-term for sustainability.

CARE STAFF AWARENESS TRAINING ON MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS OF ADULTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

J. Tsiantis

Journal of Learning Disabilities, Vol.8, 2004, p.221-234

The mental health needs of adults with learning difficulties are often not adequately addressed in a number of European countries as care staff lack the training to identify signs of mental disorders. The study evaluates a care staff training programme in Greece which aimed to improve awareness on issues of special care and recognition of the mental health needs of adults with learning disorders. Two groups of staff, one from a residential care environment, and the other from a community work environment, received training and completed three evaluation questionnaires - one prior to training, one immediately afterwards and one two months after the training had finished. The majority of staff were positive about the course and its content and their awareness of and information on mental health needs in learning disabilities increased significantly. The study concludes that supervised practical training is vital if these positive changes are to be strengthened and maintained.

CARING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN THE HAREDI COMMUNITY: ADJUSTMENT MECHANISM IN ACTION

H. Lifshitz and R. Glaubman

Disability and Society, vol.19, 2004, p.469-486

Study examined changes in the care offered to people with developmental disability in the Haredi (Jewish ultra-Orthodox) Community in Israel. Using qualitative methods, the authors investigated the establishment of educational, residential and recreational facilities for this population. Study uncovered three drivers of a gradual change in attitudes and forms of caring within the community:

  • social crisis as a catalyst for change
  • the social model of disability and rehabilitation principles;
  • the role of rabbis in the change process.
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