Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (October 2004): National Health Service - Primary and Community Care

BURIED TREASURE

C. Shannon

Health Service Journal, Vol.114, Sept. 30th 2004, p.30-31

Central Cornwall PCT suffers from historic under-investment in community services. However, fines paid by social services due to delayed discharges will raise £2m, which will be used to build up community capacity.

CAPITAL INTEREST

N. Edwards

Health Service Journal, Vol.114, Sept. 2nd 2004, p.22-23

A report of an interview with Neale Coleman, a senior advisor on health to the Mayor of London, on the growing health inequalities in the Capital and the poor quality of primary care services. He attributes these problems to the dominance of the acute sector, the complexity of the health issues facing London, and the fact that PCTs are too small to develop effective strategies.

COTTAGE INDUSTRY

N. Summerton

Health Service Journal, Vol.114, Sept. 23rd 2004, p.28-29

Cottage hospitals are developing a new role in the delivery of community healthcare to large numbers of patients in rural communities. The rural cottage hospital is ideally placed to foster closer integration between primary and secondary care, better use of intermediate care, and the development of more robust chronic disease management processes.

GP OUT-OF-HOURS SERVICES

Health Committee

London: TSO, 2004 (House of Commons papers, session 2003/04; HC697)

The report explores the reassignment of out-of-hours care from a number of GPs to Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). It considers whether PCTs are ready to take on the responsibility for GP out-of-hours services before examining the opportunities and risks of such a venture. It concludes with a list of recommendations, including encouraging PCTs to work collaboratively with GPs and replacing GP Saturday morning surgeries with clinics in primary care centres or co-located emergency departments.

"IT'S DIFFERENT FROM MY CULTURE: THEY'RE VERY DIFFERENT": PROVIDING COMMUNITY-BASED, "CULTURALLY COMPETENT" PALLIATIVE CARE FOR SOUTH ASIAN PEOPLE IN THE UK

A. Owens and G. Randhawa

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.12, 2004, p.414-421

Article offers a snapshot of how palliative care service providers attempt to achieve culturally competent care for South Asian people in Luton. It looks at the difficulties and tensions involved in marrying philosophies of palliative care with models of cultural competence. It also demonstrates the practical working out of these difficulties within the home and the community.

NATIONAL SURVEY OF PATIENT ADVICE AND LIAISON SERVICES (PALS) IN ENGLAND: CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE AND PARENTS' ACCESS TO PALS

J. Heaton and P. Sloper

Child, Vol.30, 2004, p.495-501

Results of a postal survey of PALS in 553 NHS and Primary Care Trusts show that most have developed a generic service, with some making special efforts to target hard-to-reach groups of patients. However, where such efforts have been made they have tended to focus most on older people and least of all on children.

PLAYING FOR POWER

N. Plumridge

Health Service Journal, Vol.114, Sept. 30th 2004, p.33

There is evidence that the freedoms promised to foundation hospitals are being cut back as the centre seeks to regain control. The timetable for the introduction of payment by results is also being extended.

RURAL POPULATION FINDS ITSELF ON RECEIVING END OF URBAN POLICY AGAIN

J. Trueland

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Sept.9th 20o4, p.8-9

There is concern that out of hours cover in rural areas will be inadequate when primary care trusts assume responsibility from GPs. This is due to a failure to recognise that providing out of hours care is more expensive in rural regions due to the greater geographic area that needs to be covered and the lack of providers other than GPs.

WHAT CHOICE IMPLIES FOR PRIMARY CARE

S. Peckham

British Journal of Health Care Management, Vol.10, 2004, p.210-213

There is an increasing emphasis on developing patient choice in primary care. While the main emphasis is on NHS primary care and the increasingly important role of pharmacists, dentists and opticians, there has also been a growth in the use of complementary and alternative medicine, some of which is funded and provided by the NHS. Such developments blur traditional boundaries and create new management problems for primary care.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web