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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2004): Education - UK - Higher

ADMISSIONS POLICY 'WILL FORCE OXFORD PRIVATE'

R. Garner and S. Cassidy

The Independent, Oct.6th, 2004, p.20

Oxford University will eventually leave the state higher education system because of government interference with student admissions, the head of one of its leading colleges has predicted. Michael Beloff, president of Trinity College, told the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference that Oxford would opt to become independent of state finance in 15 to 20 years.

(See also The Times, Oct. 6th 2004, p.8; The Daily Telegraph, Oct. 6th 2004, p1-3; The Guardian, Oct. 6th 2004, p.3)

A BIG ASK

D. MacLeod

Guardian Education, 5th Oct. 2004, p.20-21

As University College London launches a £300m fundraising drive, the author asks whether such appeals to prosperous alumni risk leaving new institutions even further behind.

MINISTER ON DEFENSIVE OVER ACCESS TO UNIVERSITY

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Oct. 15th 2004, p.3

Kim Howells, the Higher Education Minister, has attempted to calm the storm over charges the government is engaging in "social engineering" in universities. The drive to ensure fairer access for pupils from poorer backgrounds by using admission benchmarks has provoked complaints from university heads.

(See also The Times, Oct. 15th 2004, p.1)

PAPER TIGER

G. Alderman

Guardian Education, Oct. 12th 2004, p.22

The proposed voluntary list of 'approved' institutions misses a vital chance to clamp down on bogus universities. Private colleges not inspected, nor accredited by various named bodies, must apply for registration, but is the process rigorous enough?

RISE OF 'SOFTER SUBJECTS' PROMPTS HARD TALKING

M. Green and N. Timmins

Financial Times, Oct. 15th 2004, p.3

A further fall in the number of students going to university to do modern languages, and a rise in some of the "softer" subjects such as tourism and dance, was reported by the Universities and Colleges Admission Service. These latest figures will fuel concerns that students are not opting for the disciplines that employers and the economy require.

WIDENING ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION: THE LIMITS OF POSITIVE ACTION

N. Saunders

Education and the Law, Vol.16, 2004, p.4-19

The Education Bill currently before Parliament will offer universities financial incentives to admit more students from deprived backgrounds. Universities wishing to charge students higher fees will have to have a plan for widening access approved by the Office for Fair Access (Offa). This does not amount to authorising reverse or positive discrimination as practiced in the USA.

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