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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2004): Social Security - UK - New Deal

BUILDING CAPACITY FOR WORK: A UK FRAMEWORK FOR VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

Department for Work and Pensions

London: 2004

This new framework is intended to help people who become ill to stay in their jobs and to prevent them from leaving the workforce prematurely. It is a first step towards building a new approach to vocational rehabilitation. It provides a working definition of vocational rehabilitation, sets up a vocational rehabilitation steering group, establishes a Research Working Group and a Standards and Accreditation Working Group and highlights how the public sector can contribute by setting an example.

BUILDING ON NEW DEAL: LOCAL SOLUTIONS MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

Department for Work and Pensions

London: TSO, 2004

In an economy approaching full employment, there are still pockets of worklessness among multiply disadvantaged groups. The report proposes that New Deal personal advisers are given a menu of options from which to construct flexible, personalised support packages for their clients, regardless of what benefit they are claiming. The menu includes Jobsearch support, addressing employability skills deficits, skills training for local labour markets, wage subsidies, work experience provision, careers advice, help to set up own business, and specialised support for the most disadvantaged.

FIVE CHALLENGES FOR A GENERAL ELECTION YEAR

D. Simmonds

Working Brief, No.155, 2004, p.10-12

In an economy approaching full employment, the UK's welfare-to-work programmes are in urgent need of reform. New Deal programmes should be made available to all claimants, regardless of benefits, and should offer a revised set of rights and responsibilities to participants. Focus needs to shift to keeping people in jobs and helping those in low paid work to advance their careers.

FROM SICKNESS TO WORK: GETTING THE RIGHT PRESCRIPTION

S. Swan

Working Brief, Issue 157, 2004, p.13-15

The charity Tomorrow's People helps individuals with long term health problems to re-enter the labour market. The article describes the work of an employment advisor placed in a London medical practice who provides health and welfare advice to help people off the sickness register and back into work.

NEVER HAD IT SO GOOD? THE FUTURE OF WELFARE TO WORK IN THE UK

A. Westwood

Working Brief, No.155, 2004, p.13-14

The article argues that, in a period of low unemployment, welfare-to-work programmes should focus on helping the most disadvantaged to find jobs. They will soon be relegated to the back of the queue for assistance in the inevitable economic downturn.

POSITIVE FUTURES FOR PEOPLE WITH HIV AND AIDS

C. Earl and V. Armijo

Working Brief, Issue 157, 2004, p.16-18

The Positive Futures partnership woks with employees and individuals with HIV or AIDS to overcome barriers to employment.

RETENTION AND ADVANCEMENT: FROM WORK FIRST TO WORK FIRST AND STAY

N. Branosky

Working Brief, No.155, 2004, p.20-21

The article describes the Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project, which tests a new strategy for improving job retention and advancement for low paid workers. ERA offers a mix of financial incentives for keeping a job and advice and guidance from an Advancement Support Adviser who gives one-to-one support to each participant.

THREE MENUS, YET NO SINGLE RECIPE

A. Dadze-Arthur

Working Brief, Issue 157, 2004, p.19-21

The article compares active labour market policies in the UK, the Netherlands and Denmark.

UNACCEPTABLE LEVELS OF SICKNESS AND INCAPACITY

J. Adams

Working Brief, Issue 155, 2004, p.22-23

Nearly 13% of the working age population in North East England claims some form of incapacity benefit. The challenge of getting them back to work is now being tackled through the economic development strategy, The Northern Way, and through the "Pathways to Work" pilots launched in seven Jobcentre Plus districts.

WELFARE TO WORK: TACKLING THE BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT OF OLDER PEOPLE

National Audit Office

London: TSO, 2004 (House of Commons papers, session 2003/04; HC1026)

Found that good progress is being made in increasing the overall employment rate for older people despite a range of barriers. The employment rate of those over 50 has progressively increased since 1993, and the gap with the employment rate of all working age people is narrowing. However, substantial regional and local variations exist in employment rates for older people and the number who are economically inactive. Older people remain under-represented in most forms of training and education and age discrimination by employers remains a significant problem. Government is addressing these issues in a number of ways such as:

  • implementation of the New Deal 50 Plus;
  • employment programmes to help people on Incapacity Benefit rejoin the labour force;
  • supporting older people into self-employment.
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