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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2004): National Health Service - Funding

AGENDA FOR CHANGE: WHAT WILL IT MEAN TO YOU? A GUIDE FOR STAFF

NHS

Leeds: 2004

Sets out how the original Agenda for Change pay and grading proposals have developed following testing in the 12 "Early Implementer" sites in England. A review of the Early Implementer sites showed that overall the new pay system had worked well and staff and managers were generally positive about its impact. The vast majority of Early Implementer sites had benefited from improved partnership working and career structures for staff.

THE BILLION-DOLLAR GAMBLE

M. Greener

British Journal of Health Care Management, Vol.10, 2004, p.266-269

The cost of researching and developing a new medicine probably now exceeds one billion dollars. Unless drug companies recoup an adequate return on investment by pricing their products to reflect R&D costs, they will not be able to develop the next generation of medicines. There is a risk that if companies focus only on new drugs likely to recoup R&D costs, less common conditions could fall by the therapeutic wayside, and society may not fully realise the benefits of personalised medicine.

FOUNDATION HOSPITAL IS REBUKED FOR £4M DEFICIT

J. Laurance

The Independent, Oct. 21st 2004, p20

One of England's first foundation hospitals was publicly rebuked for running up a £4 million deficit amid signs of growing financial strains on the NHS. Monitor, the independent regulator of foundation trusts, has ordered financial advisors to go into Bradford Teaching Hospitals to agree an action plan to eliminate the overspend. It is the first time the regulator has used its powers in this way

IF YOU'VE GOT IT, USE IT - OR ARE FOUNDATIONS TOO SCARED TO USE THEIR BORROWING FREEDOMS?

H. Mooney

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Oct. 28th 2004, p.12-13

In theory, foundation hospitals now have the power to borrow money commercially under the prudential borrowing code. Three trusts are borrowing from the state in the shape of the NHS finance facility, but none has so far attempted to borrow from private lenders.

NHS FACES £15BN BLACK HOLE

J. Carvel

The Guardian, Oct. 12th 2004, p.1

The new computer system being installed by the NHS is set to cost taxpayers at least £15bn over the next ten years - more than the total investment in the Channel Tunnel. The eventual price tag may reach £30bn, five times the procurement cost announced two years ago, the Department of Health said last night. It is the first time that sums of this magnitude have been acknowledged, and follows mounting concern among NHS managers that the cost of running the computer system, a key component in the government's push towards "patient choice", will have to come out of local trust budgets.

SAVE AND PROSPER

N. Plumridge

Health Service Journal, Vol.114, Oct. 28th 2004, p.31

Practice-based commissioning will allow GP services to keep half of any savings they make. Article predicts that this could lead to GP practices being run by large corporations purely as businesses with salaried doctors. The holding companies would be likely to pocket any efficiency savings realised, rather than investing in improved services.

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