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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 2004): Social Care - UK

ANNUAL REPORT - CARE STANDARDS INSPECTORATE FOR WALES 2003-2004 (PDF format)

Nantgarw: 2004

Report analyses the Care Standards Inspectorate for Wales' findings on how the approximately 7,000 services regulated met the statutory requirements and minimum standards set by the National Assembly for Wales. While inspectors found many examples of good services, there are also concerns about how people's essential needs are met. The report also describes trends in services, showing that the number of services provided for younger children remains steady across Wales, but there is some reduction in the number of care homes.

CREATING AN E-LEARNING STRATEGY FOR SOCIAL CARE IN ENGLAND

TOPSS England and the Social Care Institute for Excellence

London: 2004

E-learning is one of the tools the social care sector can use in workforce development and service improvement. It is not an end in itself. The consultation paper introduces the key concepts of e-learning and gives brief background information about the social care sector. It focuses on key action areas and outlines draft action plans for the development of e-learning.

CRIMINAL NEGLECT

J. Perry

Community Care, Oct. 14th-20th 2004, p.42-43

The article argues that the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Bill currently before Parliament offers a good opportunity to establish in law the offence of causing harm to a vulnerable adult living in residential care, as recommended by the independent inquiry into the Longcare scandal. However, the government is not minded to amend the Bill.

HAPPY TOGETHER

J. Thornberry

Health Service Journal, vol.114, Oct. 14th 2004, p.33

Explains how Durham County Council, aided by consultants PriceWaterhouseCoopers, has developed a practical framework for pooling health and social care budgets for learning disabilities services. The framework will later be rolled out to other services. The three biggest challenges in developing the framework were building trust in how the partnership arrangements would work, improving confidence about how services would be delivered, and managing disputes between the partners.

SPIRIT OF INQUIRY

N. Stanley and J. Manthorpe

Community Care, Oct. 21st-27th 2004, p.38-39

The article discusses the potential of inquiries into serious failings of social care services to identify and spread good practice instead of focusing only on allocating blame. New and more participatory Inquiry formats need to be developed to allow family members, professionals and other service users to contribute, instead of just being interrogated by inquiry officials as now.

TEAMS SEARCH FOR WAYS TO IMPROVE ADULT CARE DELIVERY

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Oct. 25th 2004, p.2

Four study teams have been established to try to improve the efficiency with which councils and the health service spend £14.5bn a year on care services for adults. The outcome of the work is intended to have a significant impact on the way services are bought from the private and voluntary sectors to provide care home places, domiciliary care, intermediate care, mental illness, substance abuse and learning difficulties services.

VISION VALIDATED

G. Wistow and R. Wistow

Community Care, Oct. 7th-13th 2004, pp.44-45

Community Care Minister Stephen Ladyman is developing a new vision for adult social care. He proposes that it should be:

  • person-centred, so that it is tailored to the individual's circumstances and allows them to fulfil their potential;
  • proactive, so that services intervene early to help maintain independence;
  • seamless, with partner organisations working together to eliminate gaps and improve access.

This vision has received widespread support from adult care professionals.

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