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Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2004): Mental Health Services - UK

THE HIGH PRICE OF POVERTY

J. Bostock

Mental Health Today, Nov.2004, p.27-29

Research evidence shows that poverty and debt are major risk factors for mental illness in deprived communities and need to be addressed proactively through practical and policy initiatives.

INTO THE FUTURE

B. Foster

Professional Social Work, June 2004, p.17

The article explores the government's plans to improve access to child and adolescent mental health services through the introduction of primary mental health workers. It considers what their role will be, and the effect the plans will have on social workers.

IT'S A DIFFERENT THING

T. O'Neill, C. Lynch and L. Brewin

Mental Health Today, July/Aug. 2004, p.30-32

Carers of people with dual diagnosis are often isolated and lack information and support. They perceive rules about patient confidentiality to be a barrier to working effectively with their relative, as these are often used to block family out of the care process. Carers also feel they are blamed by services if their relative has a relapse. Many are unaware of their right to a carer's needs assessment.

JOINT WORKING IN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH TEAMS: IMPLEMENTATION OF AN INTEGRATED CARE PATHWAY

G. Rees and others

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.12, 2004, p.527-536

Integrated care pathways (ICPs) are a mechanism designed to formalise multi-agency working at an operational level which are currently being applied to mental health services. Evidence regarding the impact of this tool to support joint working is mixed. There is limited evidence regarding the suitability of ICPs for complex, community-based services. Study investigated professionals' views about, and experiences of, the implementation of an ICP within adult community mental health teams in a primary care trust in Scotland. Results show that, while teams were supportive of ICPs in theory, they were not implementing them in practice due to organisational barriers to integration.

A LETHAL CODE OF HONOUR

A. Gill

Community Care, Oct.28th-Nov.3rd 2004, p.38-39

In Asian communities, suicide attempts by young women may be triggered by domestic violence and the need to protect family honour. Article reports the experiences of three young women who have failed in attempting suicide, and discusses the implications for intervention and prevention.

OF LITTLE BENEFIT

L. Cullen

Community Care, Nov.11th-17th 2004, p.38-39

For the government's strategy for ending the social exclusion of people with mental health problems to succeed, it needs to include reform of the benefits system and measures to protect people against predatory and indifferent financial services.

SAME PLACE, SAME TIME

T. O'Neill

Mental Health Today, July/Aug. 2004, p.27-29

National policy in the UK requires that the care of clients with dual diagnosis of mental health and substance abuse problems should be centred in mainstream mental health service provision with input from specialist drug and alcohol agencies. Article describes how the Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care NHS Trust has tackled the problem by training all its frontline staff in substance misuse skills.

SELF-HARM AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE

T. St John

ChildRight, issue 207, 2004, p.4-5

The UK has a higher rate of self-harm among young people than any other European country, but the underlying causes of this behaviour are poorly understood, services for self-harmers are patchy and there is no coherent policy addressing the issue. In response to growing concern, the Mental Health Foundation and the Camelot Foundation have recently launched an Inquiry into self-harm amongst 11 to 25-year-olds.

SHARING THE KNOWLEDGE

E. Brewin

Mental Health Today, July/Aug. 2004, p.24-26

Describes how the Pan London Dual Diagnosis Project is rolling out training in dual diagnosis skills to all frontline NHS mental health staff.

SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

C. Jackson

Mental Health Today, Nov.2004, p.10-11

Provisions regarding compulsory treatment in the revised draft Mental Health Bill have provoked universal opposition from professional and patients' organisations.

TACKLING ROOT CAUSES

K. McKenzie

Mental Health Today, Nov.2004, p.30-32

There is a clear link between racism and the higher rates of mental illness among ethnic minority groups. We need to decrease by primary prevention the number of people from the UK ethnic minorities with mental illness and to offer culturally competent services to those who do become ill.

TOMORROW'S BIG PROBLEM: THE GROWING RECOGNITION OF A NEED FOR AUTISM SERVICES

M. Harker

Housing, Care and Support, vol.7, June 2004, p.21-25.

A survey of existing provision suggests a figure of no more than 3,000 places in specialist or autism appropriate services. Author estimates that about 8,500 extra places are needed nationally to meet demand from those with autism. About 17,000 more places are needed for those with Asperger's syndrome.

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