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Welfare Reform on the Web (December 2004): National Health Service - Funding

DID WE MISS THINGS OR WERE WE MISLED?

N. Edwards

Heath Service Journal, vol.114, Nov.25th 2004, p.22-23

Report of an interview with foundation trusts regulator Bill Moyes, following the revelation of serious financial management problems at Bradford Teaching Hospitals Trust. Mr Moyes emphasizes that foundation hospitals, like private companies, can fail but supports sensible managed competition between them.

THE EVOLUTION OF A "META-POLICY": THE CASE OF THE PRIVATE FINANCE INITIATIVE AND THE HEALTH SERVICE

J. Greenaway, B. Salter and S. Hart

British Journal of Politics and International Relations, vol.6, 2004, p.507-526

Article examines the evolution of the Private Finance Initiative in Britain from 1992, with particular reference to the NHS. The Initiative is presented as a "meta-policy" in so far as it was not sectoral, but was situated above and beyond the normal run of central government policies; it was also heavily ideologically driven. The evolution of the policy was, however, influenced by the policy networks and institutional interplay. In turn the PFI, as it gathered momentum, affected the culture, personnel and institutional structures within which it operated.

"EXPERIMENTAL" NHS COST EFFICIENCY GROWTH MEASURE

Department of Health

2004

The Department of Health wishes to replace its previous measure of efficiency, the Cost Weighted Efficiency Index, with a new measure of Value for Money which encompasses both cost efficiency and quality. It is therefore developing two new measures of Value for Money growth: the NHS Cost Efficiency Growth Measure and the NHS Service Effectiveness Growth Measure.

PAYING THE PIPER

S. Ward

Public Finance, Oct.1st-7th 2004, p.24-25

Discusses the impact of the new payment by results system on the English NHS. There are fears that the system could make hospitals financially unstable, if patients choose to be treated elsewhere and income is lost in consequence. The system also introduces a perverse incentive for hospitals to generate income by admitting patients unnecessarily. On the other hand, the clarity about payments offered by a national tariff has encouraged private investment in UK healthcare.

PRIVATE SECTOR SET FOR EXTRA £1BN BOOST FROM NHS

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Nov. 9th 2004, p.1

The private health sector is to gain close to another £1bn worth of work from the NHS as it battles to cut waiting times dramatically by 2008. A second wave of independent treatment centres, which are privately owned and run but treat NHS patients, are to be put out to tender. They will have the capacity to treat another 250,000 patients a year.

(See also Financial Times, Nov. 9th 2004, p.2)

SHUNNED HOSPITALS 'MAY GO BUST' AS PATIENTS GET CHOICE

N. Timmins

Financial Times, Nov. 23rd 2004, p.4

National Health Service hospitals and private sector providers will go bust if they fail to attract sufficient business when patients get the right to choose hospitals for routine operations, says a leading health economist. Professor Alan Maynard, chairman of York NHS Trust, said "there is a general feeling that the NHS is starting to acquire not just extra capacity but excess capacity".

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