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Welfare Reform on the Web (January 2005): Social Security - Overseas

COMPULSORY WORK EXPERIENCE PROGRAMS: HINDRANCE OR HELP?

A. Nevile

Education and Training, vol.46, 2004, p.246-252

Article reports on a review of the "Work for the Dole" programme in Australia, which provides work experience for young people who are struggling to find secure employment. The programme appears more successful than its overseas counterparts in helping disadvantaged young people make the transition from school to work. It is particularly good at delivering "soft outcomes" such as increased self-esteem, improved communication and interpersonal skills, which ameliorate some of the negative impacts of unemployment on personal well-being.

A DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE WELL-BEING OF WIC RECIPIENTS AND ELIGIBLE NON-RECIPIENTS

C. Gundersen

Children and Youth Services Review, vol.27, 2005, p.99-114

The Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) provides nutritious food to pregnant women, babies and young children under five. However, over 1 in 4 eligible infants and 6 in 10 eligible children do not receive WIC. Analysis shows that, in comparison to persons who are still receiving WIC, infants and children who have left the programme have higher family incomes, lower participation rates in other assistance programmes, and are less likely to be eligible for WIC benefits. However, a high percentage of infants and children who have left WIC are still in need of assistance, and only 1 in 9 is ineligible for the programme. Infants and children who have never participated in WIC despite being eligible at one point are better-off than continuing participants or those who have exited the programme. Nevertheless, the set of infants and children who have never received WIC includes many in families with very low incomes.

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