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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2005): Community Regeneration and Development - UK

MODEL CITIZENS

T. Travers

Public Finance, Feb.11th-17th 2005, p.30-32

The Labour government is seeking to revitalise democracy in the UK by engaging citizens in the governance of service provision at neighbourhood level. The proposed new units of neighbourhood government will be able to draw up contracts with local authorities for service provision and get byelaws passed to control activities within their areas. Voluntary organisations and faith groups will be encouraged to assume neighbourhood leadership roles, and local councillors will become advocates for their communities. A neighbourhood charter will set out what people can expect from central and local government and other service providers.

"ON THE SIDE OF THE ANGELS": COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT IN THE GOVERNANCE OF NEIGHBOURHOOD RENEWAL

F. Robinson, K. Shaw and G. Davidson

Local Economy, vol.20, 2005, p.13-26

In the New Deal for Communities, the intention is that community representatives should have a central role in developing and implementing regeneration that is locally owned, locally led and addresses problems identified by the local community. The approach has met with some success, but community capacity has proved limited, adequate representation is difficult to achieve and there has been friction with local government. For community involvement in governance to work, it has to be enabled by the right structures and processes, and by support for community representatives.

POVERTY REBRANDED

N. Bateman

Community Care, Feb.24th-Mar.2nd 2005, p.34-35

A local authority anti-poverty strategy is a council-wide approach which tries to raise awareness of poverty and steer the council towards reducing poverty in its community. They were popular in the early 1990s, but have been marginalised by national initiatives since the Labour government came to power in 1997.

RESCALING REGENERATION: EXPERIENCES OF MERGING AREA-BASED AND CITY-WIDE PARTNERSHIPS IN URBAN REGENERATION.

J. Coaffee

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol.17, 2004, p.443-459

The city of Newcastle-upon-Tyne has been used to test out numerous regeneration strategies and partnerships over the past 30 years. These developments have transformed the linkages between central government and localities, and between local authorities and citizens, especially with regard to issues of trust. Paper highlights issues by showing how the government's flagship community regeneration partnership collided with an ambitious and far-reaching local authority city-wide regeneration strategy.

URBAN CHANGE AND CONFLICT: THE ROLE OF PARTNERSHIPS IN URBAN REGENERATION IN THE UK

M. Ball and P.J. Maginn

Housing Studies, vol.20, 2005, p.9-28

Over the past 20 years the focus of urban renewal in the UK has moved from property redevelopment to community regeneration based on local partnerships. Paper begins by outlining the evolution of partnership approaches to urban regeneration. Then argues that most attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach have been partial in nature, so that no true picture of the gains from this policy has emerged. Current debate has focussed on getting local communities actively involved in regeneration, and has ignored questions of competition over land use and the managerial effectiveness of partnerships. In particular authors point out that current regeneration policy favours the interests of incumbent communities (suburbanites and some inner city residents) over those of potential immigrants into the city region.

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