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Welfare Reform on the Web (March 2005): Education - UK - Higher

CAMBRIDGE REJECTS 5,000 STRAIGHT-A STUDENTS

R. Smithers and P. Curtis

The Guardian, Feb. 22nd 2005, p.2

More than 5,000 students achieving three straight As at A-level were rejected by Cambridge University last year, fuelling concerns that the education system's so-called gold standard has been devalued.

(See also The Daily Telegraph, Feb. 22nd 2005, p.7)

CATCH' EM WHILE YOU CAN

M. Taylor

Education Guardian, Feb. 8th 2005, p.2-3

Article claims that universities across the UK are planning to step up their recruitment of overseas students. But are those students getting a fair deal and will they really bring universities the financial security they seek?

COLLEGES CASH IN ON CLOSER LINKS TO INDUSTRY

M. Green

Financial Times, Feb. 9th 2005, p.4

A survey by the Higher Education Funding Council for England covering 2002/05 has shown that fees from consultancy and training are soaring. However, only 7% of research funding was supplied by business. Income from intellectual property has declined, with UK universities lagging behind the US in generating income from licensing deals.

ENGLISH UNIVERSITIES TARGET CASH FROM 35,000 MORE FOREIGN STUDENTS

M. Taylor

The Guardian, Feb. 8th 2005, p.3

Figures from the Higher Education Funding Council for England predict a 20% rise in non-EU students at English Universities, alongside a 4% increase in British and EU undergraduates. Non-EU students are more lucrative than British nationals, as they are asked to pay full fees.

THE IMPACT OF A NATIONAL POLICY TO ENHANCE TEACHING QUALITY AND STATUS, ENGLAND, THE UNITED KINGDOM

D. Gosling

Quality Assurance in Education, vol.12, 2004, p.136-149

The Teaching Quality Enhancement Fund was established by the Higher Education Funding Council for England to improve the quality of teaching and raise its status in higher education. Paper considers the three strands of the initiative (subject, institutional and individual) and uses findings from a variety of evaluation studies to assess the impact of the policy.

KILLING THINKING: THE DEATH OF THE UNIVERSITIES

M. Evans

London: Continuum, 2005

Author condemns the culture of auditing and assessment that has invaded English universities. This has led to the introduction of benchmarking, where those in charge of a subject are required to lay down exactly what a graduate in that subject should know. This has killed off any notion of encouraging students to think freely and experience the intellectual excitement which introduction to a learned topic has hitherto engendered.

MUDDLE ENGLAND

P. Curtis

Education Guardian, Feb. 22nd 2005, p.22

Article asks could students get a degree from a top university more cheaply at a further education college?

STUDENTS RUSH TO BEAT RISING FEES

T. Halpin, The Times, Feb 17th 2005, p.16

Students face record competition for university places this autumn, with thousands more applicants scrambling to beat the rise in tuition fees, new figures have revealed. Applications have surged by almost 9 per cent compared with the same period last year, the biggest increase since Tony Blair became Prime Minister in 1997. Popular universities, already overwhelmed by well-qualified applicants, are certain to respond by raising their required A-level grades.

UNIVERSITY CHIEFS CONCERNED AT FALL IN NUMBER OF OVERSEAS STUDENTS

M. Green

Financial Times, Feb. 17th 2005, p.4

The number of students from outside the European Union wanting to study in Britain has fallen this year despite an overall increase in both British and foreign applicants. The drop-off in overseas students will worry universities, who have become increasingly reliant on the higher tuition fees they can charge students from outside the UK.

(See also The Financial Times, Feb. 17th 2005, p. 13)

UNIVERSITY TUTORS IGNORE CHEATING

M. Taylor

The Guardian, Feb. 17th 2005, p. 8

More than half of Britain's university academics have turned a blind eye to students they suspect of cheating, according to a paper to be published later this year. Research by staff at University College London found that 51% of tutors admitted they had taken no action when they feared their students were guilty of plagiarism or collusion.

UNIVERSITY UNDER SIEGE? TRUST AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE CONTEMPORARY ACADEMY

P. Baert and A. Shipman

European Societies, vol.7, 2005, p.157-185

Paper explores the shift in European higher education from the Humboldtian notion of the university as an autonomous body of self-governing professionals to one where the university operates under quasi-market conditions. While increasing the culture of accountability in universities, this development, linked to changes in sponsorship and associated missions, is associated with an erosion of traditional mechanisms of trust. Article focuses on the UK experience which is now extending internationally.

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