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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2005): Education - UK - Higher

ENTERPRISE SKILLS FOR THE ECONOMY

L. Galloway and others

Education and Training, vol.47, 2005, p.7-17

Paper looks at the concept of providing university students in the UK with entrepreneurial skills and considers the importance of these in promoting economic growth. Results of a survey of 519 students suggest that any increase in graduate entrepreneurship is likely to be long-term, since most envisage going into paid employment when they leave university. However, many students expect to work in small firms and assume that the skills developed by enterprise education are applicable to both waged employment and entrepreneurship.

LSE HAS QUOTAS FOR STATE STUDENTS

L. Lightfoot

Daily Telegraph, Mar. 10th 2005, p.1

The London School of Economics is operating a secret quota system favouring state educated pupils at the expense of better qualified applicants form the independent sector, it has been disclosed. It was the first firm evidence to support the fears of independent school head teachers that their pupils are facing discrimination as universities strive to meet the Government's targets for the recruitment of more students from disadvantaged backgrounds

ROW OVER FUNDING FOR OPEN UNIVERSITY

C. Adams

Financial Times, Mar. 11th 2005, p.2

A row has erupted over funding for the Open University, the country's best-known distance learning institution. Its senior management has warned that it needs financial help if it is to avoid losing large numbers of students. Higher education authorities have refused the OU's demands for millions of pounds in extra funding that could save it from having to increase its fees.

UK e-UNIVERSITY

Education and Skills Committee

London: TSO, 2005 (House of Commons papers, session 2004/05; HC205)

The UK e-University (UKeU) was launched in September 2003 and wound up in February 2004 due to lack of demand, having cost £50m of public money. Committee reports that the UKeU failed largely because it took a supply-driven rather than a demand-led approach. It failed to undertake market research to assess demand and wrongly assumed that once it had developed an integrated e-learning platform it would be easy to recruit students. The project also failed to attract the expected levels of private sector investment.

UNIVERSITIES' £300M LURE FOR BEST STUDENTS

R. Smithers

The Guardian, Mar. 17th 2005, p.4

The introduction of top-up tuition fees comes an important step closer as details are made public of the £300m package of "non-repayable cash" being offered by more than 100 universities to tempt the best students. The government's university regulator has authorised them to charge the maximum top-up tuition fees of up to £3,000 a year, from next year, after approving the individual agreements they have put forward which will help support an estimated 400,000 student from poorer backgrounds through degree courses. These include additional grants of up to £3,000 a year from a handful of elite universities to benefits in kind such as travel and sports passes, book vouchers and free bicycles and computers.

(See also The Independent, Mar. 17th 2005, p.4)

UNIVERSITIES FAIL TO MEET STUDENTS' DEMAND FOR MORE PLACES

T. Halpin

The Times, Mar. 10th 2005, p.4

Students will find it harder to get into university this year despite an expansion of places on degree courses, the head of the Funding Council for Higher Education has stated. The number of full-time undergraduate places will rise by only 5,300, according to the Higher Education Funding Council for England, whilst applications have increased sharply as students have scrambled to secure places before annual tuition fees rise to £3,000 next year.

(See also The Independent, Mar. 10th 2005, p.18)

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