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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2005): Healthcare - Overseas

CHILD HEALTH CARE CENTRES: AN ACADEMIC MODEL FOR COMPREHENSIVE CHILD HEALTH CARE IN THE COMMUNITY.

M. Katz and others

Child, vol. 31, 2005, p.217 - 222

The article describes the background, services and development of Israel's Child Health Centre (CHC) model for comprehensive community health care of children and adolescents and for paediatric training.

A NATIONAL FORMULARY FOR CANADA

A. Hollis and S. Law

Canadian Public Policy, vol.30, 2004, p.445-452

Formularies are lists of drugs that are approved as a benefit under provincial drug programmes and some private insurance plans. Unlisted drugs are ineligible for reimbursement under most insurance plans. Using data on formulary costs, evidence from court cases and arguments from economic theory, article examines potential benefits and costs of replacing Canada's ten provincial formularies with a single national formulary. Benefits include increased buyer power, lower prices, less duplication and improved decision-making. The main cost is that provinces would lose the ability to tailor the formulary to their individual financial or social situation.

PUBLIC HEALTH CARE WORK UNDER PRESSURE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

P. Streefland

Health Policy, vol.71, 2005, p.375-382

The decline in investment in publicly funded health care in Africa since the 1980s has eroded both standards and public trust in the government as a provider of health services. In response, health professionals have set up their own private practices, often using materials filched from the state system.

QUALITY OF HEALTH SERVICES IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES IN SOUTH-EAST NIGERIA

J.E. Ehiri and others

Child, vol. 31, 2005, p. 181 - 191

Aiming to asses the quality of primary health care (PHC) services for children, this study reports that adequate provision existed only in some areas such as immunization and diarrhoea management. Attention is drawn to deficient drug supplies and inadequate emergency care facilities. Concludes that problems are due to both structural and process failures, and recommends that, in comparable less developed country settings, improvement efforts focus on cost-effective measures aimed especially at proper use of case management guidelines and supervision, as well as at improving equipment and drug resources.

SUPERVISION IN SOCIAL HEALTH INSURANCE: A FOUR COUNTRY STUDY

H. Maarse, A. Paulus and G. Kuiper

Health Policy, vol.71, 2005, p.333-346

Article reports on the findings of a comparative study of supervision in social health insurance in four European countries (Belgium, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands). Study looked at the goals, institutional structure and process of supervision in each country, also focusing on the impact of competition and marketisation on the supervisory system. It is argued that competition will substantially alter the role of supervisory agencies in social health insurance.

WHY CHOICE WENT DUTCH

P. Neuburg

Health Service Journal, vol.115, Mar. 3rd 2005, p.18-19

Describes how the Dutch government is introducing patient choice into the healthcare system in order to drive down costs. A large government public information programme is developing and publishing performance indicators for hospitals and health insurers. At the same time healthcare insurers are being encouraged to compete for clients. From January 2006, all will be required to offer a compulsory health insurance policy covering a standard package of care, but they will be able to compete on quality of providers and the extent of the co-payments payable by their clients.

WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND HEALTH: THE CASE OF OROMO WOMEN IN ETHIOPIA

B.F. Dugassa

Health Care for Women International vol. 26, 2005, p.149-169

The HIV & AIDS epidemic in Ethiopia generally affects poor communities and women. Women's empowerment and involvement in agenda setting on health promotion is essential. Analysed within a framework of dignity, rights to life and information for autonomous health determination, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, "social well being" and the World Health Organisation's definition of health, this article examines rights violations and lost opportunities for Oromo women.

"WORKING AT THE MARGINS" OR "LEADING FROM BEHIND"? A CANADIAN STUDY OF HOSPITAL-COMMUNITY COLLABORATION

B. Poland and others

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.13, 2005, p.125-135

The Hospital Involvement in Community Action (HICA) study undertook detailed case studies and a telephone survey in order to learn about the range of collaborations and working relationships that exist between hospitals and community agencies in Ontario and the factors that enabled or hindered them. Results showed that:

  • the fiscal environment in Ontario is not supportive of hospital involvement in community action;
  • hospital-based champions and support at chief executive level are needed to sustain momentum;
  • community organisations are often wary of unequal partnerships with hospitals.
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