Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2005): Mental Health Services - UK

DIRECT PAYMENTS AND MENTAL HEALTH: NEW DIRECTIONS

K. Newbigging and J. Lowe

Pavilion, 2005

The take-up of direct payments by people with mental health problems has been very low in most parts of the UK. Discussions with over 250 service users and staff show that take-up could be increased by:

  • provision of straightforward, accurate and accessible information which is specific to mental health;
  • provision of advocacy and practical support;
  • a change of culture in the mental health services, including a tangible commitment to promoting self-determination;
  • integration of direct payments with the Care Programme Approach;
  • effective leadership at the national and local level.

THE IMPACT OF "STATUTORY DUTIES" ON MENTAL HEALTH SOCIAL WORKERS IN THE UK

S. Evans and others

Health and Social Care in the Community, vol.13, 2005, p.145-154

In the UK, applications for involuntary admission to psychiatric units are made by specially trained Approved Social Workers (ASWs). Proposed changes in legislation will enable other professionals to undertake statutory duties. However, data collected from a cross-sectional survey of mental health social workers and telephone survey of managers showed that ASW status increased stress and job dissatisfaction, especially for men, and was related to a desire to leave the current job. It therefore seems likely that extending statutory duties to other professionals will increase levels of stress, burnout and job dissatisfaction in these groups also.

MENTAL HEALTH

E. Forrest (editor)

Health Service Journal, vol.115, Mar. 31st 2005, supplement, 13p.

Begins by reporting on how reforms to the mental health services promised by the NHS Plan and the National Service Framework are progressing. Spending is at an all time high, but there is still a lack of transparency around funding. More needs to be done to meet the needs of minority ethnic users. Supplement goes on to look at good hospital design and how payment-by-results could most effectively be implemented in mental health care. Finally offers best practice advice and expert opinion on a range of issues.

MENTAL HEALTH AND DEAFNESS: TOWARDS EQUITY AND ACCESS

National Institute for Mental Health in England [and] Department of Health

[London: 2005]

Guidance sets out how mental health services for Deaf people can be improved using the Mental Health NSF as a starting point. Recommendations include:

  • frontline NHS staff being given Deaf awareness training;
  • every primary care facility having access to sign language translation services;
  • staff in mental health services being encouraged to learn sign language;
  • Child Protection Committees reviewing procedures to ensure that Deaf children's needs are being met.

THE NATIONAL SERVICE FRAMEWORK FOR MENTAL HEALTH FIVE YEARS ON

L. Appleby

London: Department of Health, 2004

Review reveals that the mental health NSF has triggered significant activity in a previously neglected area. Specialist community mental health teams have been set up offering home treatment, early intervention and intensive support for people with complex needs. Staff numbers have substantially increased and modern treatments are in widespread use. Most service users report that their experience of mental health care has been positive, and suicide rates have fallen to their lowest recorded level. However, inpatient services and services for people from ethnic minorities and people with dual diagnosis need improvement. The NHS also needs to tackle the care of people with enduring mental illness in primary care, the social exclusion of people with mental health problems and the limited availability of psychological therapies.

READ THE RIGHTS ACT

P. Finnegan and S. Clarke

Community Care, Mar.10th-16th 2005, p.34-35

Article looks at the impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 on people with learning difficulties. Research has shown that:

  • lack of choice in everyday life is undermining the right to "development of the personality in relationship with others";
  • there is significant discrimination against people with learning difficulties in healthcare;
  • organisations lack effective procedures for dealing with inter-personal relationship problems such as bullying.

RESPECT YOUR ELDERS

W. Little

Health Service Journal, vol.115, Mar.17th 2005, p.25-26

Mental health services for older people tend to be neglected by policymakers in favour of general adult mental health services. Inadequate staffing, lack of capacity and insufficient intermediate care are all contributing factors. However there are signs that services for older people are creeping up the mental health agenda. Article concludes with a positive case study of a new initiative by Bolton, Salford and Trafford Mental Health Trust to train primary care staff in the West Midlands in the early identification of mental health problems in older people.

RISK STRATEGY

M. O'Hara

Society Guardian, Mar. 9th 2005, p.6-7

Article notes that police and health professionals are poles apart on how best to deal with dangerously mentally ill people.

TOWARDS EQUITY AND ACCESS: MENTAL HEALTH AND DEAFNESS: BEST PRACTICE GUIDANCE

National Institute for Mental Health

2005

Provides advice on delivering mental health services to Deaf people who use sign language (primarily British Sign Language) based on responses to an earlier consultation.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web