Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2005): Welfare State - Overseas

FROM "SAFETY NETS" BACK TO "UNIVERSAL SOCIAL PROVISION": IS THE GLOBAL TIDE TURNING?

B. Deacon

Global Social Policy, vol.5, 2005, p.19-28

At the end of the twentieth century powerful states such as the USA and powerful institutions such as the World Bank framed the international discourse about social policy in terms of a targeted "safety net" approach. Author detects signs that the case for universal social welfare provision is again being recognised by international agencies.

NEW RISKS, NEW WELFARE: THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE EUROPEAN WELFARE STATE

P. Taylor-Gooby

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005-03-30

This book introduces the concept of new social risks in welfare state studies and explains their relevance to the comparative understanding of social policy in Europe. New social risks arise from the shifts in the balance of work and family life due to the declining importance of the male breadwinner family, changes in the labour market, and the impact of globalization on national policy-making. They differ from the old risks of the standard industrial life-course, concerned with interruptions to income from sickness, unemployment, retirement, and similar issues. New social risks pose new challenges, such as the expansion of care for children and the elderly, promoting more equal opportunities, the activation of labour markets and the management of needs that arise from welfare state reform. They present new opportunities for the coordination of policies at the EU level.

TRANSFORMING THE DEVELOPMENTAL WELFARE STATE IN EAST ASIA

H-J. Kwon

Basingstoke, Palgrave MacMillan, 2005

Since the economic crisis of 1997, there have been significant social policy reforms in East Asia. Using the concept of the 'developmental welfare state' this book seeks to answer the question as to whether the welfare reforms in East Asia have extended social rights while maintaining its development credentials.

GLOBALIZATION, TAX REFORM AND SOCIAL POLICY FINANCING

S. Ganghof

Global Social Policy, vol.5, 2005, p.77-95

Article analyses patterns of income tax reform during the last 25 years and their impact on social welfare, focusing on OECD countries. There were two types of income tax reform: Comprehensive Income Tax according to which all types of income should be taxed jointly under a common rate schedule and Dual Income Taxation, under which all types of capital income are taxed under a uniform low and proportional tax rate, while labour incomes are subjected to a progressive tax rate schedule. Article goes on to consider the role of income taxation in achieving social policy outcomes. Firstly, the distribution of the income tax burden adds to the overall redistributive profile of societies. Secondly, the size of income tax relative to other types of taxes (tax mix) may influence policymakers' ability to maintain high social policy expenditures.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web