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Welfare Reform on the Web (April 2005): Welfare State - UK

BUDGET 2005: INVESTING FOR OUR FUTURE: FAIRNESS AND OPPORTUNITY FOR BRITAIN'S HARD WORKING FAMILIES

H M Treasury

London: TSO, 2005 (House of Commons papers, session 2004/05; HC372

Budget 2005: main points:

  • Child Welfare
  • child tax credit is to rise by 13% over the next three years. Child benefit is to rise by 50p to £17 for the first child and by 35p to £11.40 for other children;
  • Education
  • increased cash for primary schools - each typically getting over £100,000 in the next three years;
  • improved financial support for 16 to 19 year olds in learning, through extending Child Benefit and Child Tax credit from April 2006 and piloting a new Agreement and Allowance for 16 to 17 year olds not in education, employment or training
  • Pensioners
  • pension credit should benefit 3.2m pensioner households, or 3.7m pensioners. Pensioners will also receive an £200 a year council tax refund;
  • free local bus travel for every pensioner from next year
  • Unemployment
  • providing extra support for people on incapacity benefits who want to return to work.

CHILD POVERTY TARGET LIKELY TO BE MISSED, SAYS INSTITUTE

N.Timmins

Financial Times, Mar. 31st 2005, p.3

It looks "more likely than not" that the government will miss one of its key child poverty targets, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies. Its assessment came as the latest income figures from the Department for Work and Pensions showed that just 100,000 extra children were taken out of poverty in 2003-04, taking the total since 1998 to 700,000 - a much smaller fall than most analysts expected. This leaves between 300,000 and 500,000 more children to be lifted out of poverty in just one year if the goal of reducing child poverty by a quarter is to be achieved on time.

THE WELFARE STATE IN BRITAIN SINCE 1945

R.Lowe

Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2005

The purpose of this book is to examine in depth the period from the establishment of the welfare state in the mid-1940s to its perceived crisis in the mid-1970s and then separately the years since 1976. It is divided into three parts:

  • theoretical perspectives on the nature of the welfare state and the nature of policy-making;
  • the classic welfare state, 1945-1975 including employment policy, social security, healthcare, education, housing and the personal social services;
  • the welfare state since 1976 including the impact of 'Thatcherism' and New Labour since 1997.
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