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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 1999): Social Care - Community Care

BLURRED VISION

V. Drennan and R. Levenson

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, August 12th 1999, p. 22-23

Reports evaluation of the implementation of a home care/district nursing joint operational policy agreed between the London boroughs of Camden and Islington, Camden and Islington Community Trust and Camden and Islington Health Authority. The written agreement on division of responsibilities for home care was welcomed by staff, but was felt to be no substitute good personal communication between different groups.

CONCERN FOR YOUNG CARERS

A. Whittle

Caring Times, June 1999, p. 17

Proposes that support for young carers should be provided through a partnership between local authorities and the private sector. This can provide not only support and counselling in the carer's home but also supply respite care when needed.

INTER-AGENCY SERVICES IN ENGLAND AND THE NETHERLANDS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INTEGRATED CARE DEVELOPMENT AND DELIVERY

B. Hardy et al.

Health Policy, vol. 48, 1999, p. 87-105

Article examines the difficulties involved in providing an integrated package of health and social care services delivered by different agencies to clients with multiple problems. Begins by analysing the UK and Dutch health and social care systems and identifying the barriers to integrated care management. Concludes by identifying general mechanisms which impede or facilitate the delivery of integrated care to multi-problem patients.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT, STREET LEVEL BUREAUCRACY AND THE NEW COMMUNITY CARE

K. Ellis, A. Davis and K. Rummery

Social Policy and Administration, vol. 33, 1999, p. 262-80

In the wake of the Seebohm reforms of the personal social services in the 1970s, research showed that social workers behaved like 'street-level bureaucrats', using their discretionary authority defensively to manage an otherwise overwhelming workload. In the 1990s, top-down assessment and formal management systems were put in place as part of community care reforms. The aim was to reduce the scope of professional discretion so as to standardise responses to need and control demand according to resources available. Paper considers the success of the new systems in controlling 'bottom-up' decision-making by drawing on a recent empirical study of needs assessment in three types of social work team.

NEGOTIATING NEEDS, ACCESS AND GATEKEEPING: DEVELOPMENTS IN HEALTH AND COMMUNITY CARE POLICIES IN THE UK AND THE RIGHTS OF DISABLED AND OLDER CITIZENS

K. Rummery and C. Glendinning

Critical Social Policy, vol. 19, 1999, p. 335-351

Argues that the cumulative consequences of community care policies in the UK have resulted in a move from universal access to NHS services to discretionary access to residual local authority services. Drawing on an empirical study of the experiences of disabled and older people in obtaining access to community care assessments, article argues that the traditional gatekeeping activities of professionals have been augmented by a range of managerial and bureaucratic gatekeeping procedures.

RECRUITMENT CRISIS LOOMS FOR HOME CARE

M. Hunter

Community Care, no. 1286, 1999, p. 8-9

Reports that low rates of pay have combined with competition from large retailers and the low status of the work to make recruitment of staff to work in the home care sector increasingly difficult.

SCOTLAND TO PIONEER INTEGRATED SERVICES

R. McKay

Community Care, no. 1285, 1999, p. 8-9

The news that the Scottish Office has pumped almost £1 million into a major project to fully integrate community services now split between health and social work in Perth & Kinross has raised fears that traditional social services departments will be undermined.

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