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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 1999): Services for the Disabled - UK

DISABLED WORKERS TO LOSE JOBS

L. Ward

Guardian, August 27th 1999, p. 1

Reports that ministers have approved the closure of up 18 factories run by Remploy, which was founded in 1945 to provide work for disabled war veterans, but now employs others with physical and mental disabilities. Labour has maintained a Tory-imposed freeze on the £94m annual government subsidy for Remploy, representing a 10% cut over three years in real terms. Ministers have also endorsed the axing of the priority suppliers scheme, which used government orders to support factories.

EX PARTE COUGHLAN: FOLLOW-UP ACTION

Interim guidance on how health and local authorities should respond to the Coughlan judgement instructs them to work together, involving primary care groups where appropriate, to review policies and eligibility criteria in the light of both the judgement and existing guidance.

JUGGLING TO KEEP WITHIN THE LAW

J. Halford

Community Living, vol.13, July/August 1999, p. 16-17

Under increasing financial pressure, many local authorities have increased charges for services for disabled people living in the community or introduced cost capping. This imposes ceilings on what will be provided which are the equivalent in cost terms of providing residential care. If residential care is unacceptable to the service user, they are offered a 'capped' package of non-residential services which are equivalent in costs. Article considers whether such strategies are lawful.

NURSING HOME CARE: WHO PAYS?

P. Grose

Caring Times, Sept. 1999, p. 13

Far from being a landmark ruling which will bring free nursing care to all nursing home patients, the Appeal Court's ruling in the Coughlan case has added to the present confusion. Article examines how the court came to its decision.

REMPLOY DIRECTORS' PAY RISES SPARK ROW

K. Harper

Guardian, Sept. 9th 1999, p. 25

Reports that directors of Remploy, the UK's largest employer of disabled people, have been awarding themselves large pay increases while planning to cut staff on grounds of cost cutting.

SALVE OF SUPPORT

N. Valius

Community Care, no. 1288, 1999, p. 9

Reports sceptical responses to government proposals to set targets for numbers of disabled people using the supported employment scheme who later move into mainstream jobs.

SERVICES FOR SENSORY IMPAIRED PEOPLE: A CASE FOR REGIONAL CO-ORDINATION?

J. Banham and M. Colville

Managing Community Care, vol.7, August 1999, p. 9-14

Services for deaf and blind people are acknowledged to be generally poor. While a national task force is examining new ways to meet the needs of people with disabilities, this paper surveys the national picture and argues for the introduction of regional co-ordination.

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