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Welfare Reform on the Web (November 1999): National Health Service - Community and Primary Care Services

COUNT US IN

K. McIntosh

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, Sept. 1st 1999, p. 9-10

Interviews with chief executives of a number of Primary Care Groups who are keen to move on to Trust status.

HOW MANY GPs DOES IT TAKE......

S. Ainsworth

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, August 12th 1999, p. 16-17

Argues against the pursuit of a salaried GP service for the NHS on the grounds that a whole new tier of bureaucracy would be required to run the system.

INTEGRATING A PRIMARY CARE NURSING TEAM: ONE APPROACH

R. Carnwell and L. MacFarlane

Community Practitioner, vol. 72, 1999, p. 252-255

Self-managed integrated nursing teams can potentially offer a more satisfying way for staff to work and better care for patients. Paper explains the strengths and weaknesses of a project to develop a self-managed team of community and practice nurses in a GP practice in the West Midlands.

MORE LOLLY, MORE JOLLY

L. Hobby and S. Abbott

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, Sept. 9th 1999, p. 26

Reports results of a study showing that offering advice to primary care patients about claiming welfare benefits to increase their income can lead to significant improvements in health and well-being.

PATIENTS 'STRUCK OFF BY GPs FOR BEING UNECONOMIC'

S. Boseley

Guardian, Sept. 13th 1999, p. 7

Reports results of research showing that GPs may be striking patients off their lists in order to maximise profits. GPs receive financial rewards for meeting quotas for screening and vaccination programmes. Research shows that doctors have removed from their lists infants whose parents refuse to let them have the MMR vaccine. Patients requiring expensive medication are also at risk.

(See also Independent, Sept. 13th 1999, p. 7)

PLEDGE ON FAST HOSPITAL BOOKINGS

A. Sparrow and C. Hall

Daily Telegraph, Sept. 2nd 1999, p. 2

Reports on plans to launch a computer system that will allow a GP with a patient who needs to see a consultant to fix a hospital appointment immediately from the surgery.

THIN ON THE GROUND

J. Hayward, R. Rosen and S., Dewar

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, August 26th 1999, p. 26-27

Results of a postal survey show that in most PCGs clinical governance is being led by two people, usually a GP and a nurse. A fifth of the leads for clinical governance have no experience of working on quality issues. Nearly a third of respondents felt that their health authority had provided poor support or none at all. Only 10 PCGs had identified a clinical governance budget, and none was working with a finance manager to develop the system.

TREASURY COST JITTERS MEAN JUST 10 PCTs MAY SPEARHEAD REFORMS

K. McIntosh

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, August 26th 1999, p. 2-3

Predicts that about 10 PCTs will go live in the first wave in April 2000, followed by 30-40 more in the second wave. Treasury officials are believed to be keen to rein in the overall costs of PCTs, which are entitled to up to £275,000 start-up funds.

VARIATIONS ENIGMA

E. Rodger and S. Watkins

Health Service Journal, vol. 109, Sept. 2nd 1999, p. 20-23

A project to benchmark general practices against a series of indicators has highlighted wide variations between practices in different HAs. There are large differences in the make-up and coverage of GP practices, prescribing performance, services offered to patients, practice infrastructure, information management and technology, and patient access and involvement.

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