Click here to skip to content

Welfare Reform on the Web (May 2005): Care of the Elderly - Overseas

AGEING MATTERS: EUROPEAN POLICY LESSONS FROM THE EAST

J. Doling, C. Jones Finer and T. Maltby

Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005

This book is the first to examine in detail the experiences and prospects of population aging in those Asian countries with the highest GDP per capita. The authors ask to what extent Asia and 'old Europe' can learn from each other in terms of policy planning. The first section of the book sets out the current situation in terms of the demographic characteristics and policy predicaments of European and Asian countries. The second section presents case-studies of six countries:

  • Japan
  • Hong Kong
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Taiwan
  • Malaysia

COMMON EXPERIENCES OF STAFF WORKING IN INTEGRATED HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE ORGANISATIONS: A EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE

K. Coxon

Journal of Integrated Care, vol.13, Apr. 2005, p.13-21

Paper presents a comparison of the views of staff working in 18 integrated health and social care settings for older people across Europe. Increased job satisfaction and development of a shared culture were seen as advantages of integrated working, but participants also reported inter-professional tensions and a range of barriers to integrated working generally. Problems persisted particularly when health and social care teams worked in different organisations.

PAYING FOR CARE: THE JAPANESE MODEL

J. Dix

Working with Older People, vol.9, Mar. 2005, p.24-26

In Japan, everyone aged 40 or above (including over-65s) pays premiums for long-term care insurance. From the age of 65, any care they need will be paid for through the insurance system. Half the funding for long-term care comes from public funds. Fixed premiums for the insurance scheme are set by income bracket and periodically assessed.

Search Welfare Reform on the Web